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NEED ADVICE: install level floor over sloping concrete garage floor

NEED ADVICE: install level floor over sloping concrete garage floor

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  #1  
Old 09-24-20, 11:29 AM
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Question NEED ADVICE: install level floor over sloping concrete garage floor

Hello everyone,
First time posting here, thanks for reading. I just bought a house, built in 1952, with a detached finished garage that I plan to use as an artist studio/workshop. Like most garages from this era, the concrete floor slopes from the back of the garage towards the garage door. I want to build a level shop floor over the sloped concrete floor. The concrete is currently covered with epoxy paint, so using self-leveling compound or pouring a new concrete floor probably not a good option.
Iím trying to decide whether to frame a sleeper system, shimmed to level, directly on the concrete, or to use one of those adjustable deck pedestal systems (like, for instance, the Elmich Versijack system) to support timber joists. The pedestal system is likely a lot more expensive, but perhaps easier to work with to create a level floor (plus, itís not a permanent floor so can be easily removed in the event I someday sell the house).
Does anyone have experience with these pedestal systems, or recommend them, or recommend against them? Iíd be grateful for advice and suggestions on either option.
I think my goal is to find, not necessarily the cheapest solution, but the simplest and easiest/quickest to install.
Thanks everyone!
Pics of the garage interior here:


 
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  #2  
Old 09-24-20, 03:38 PM
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One option is to rip the sleepers to match the floor angle so the top of the sleepers/joists are level. This is the most solid and can preserve a bit more ceiling height if you do it right but it can be difficult to get right as your floor probably has some undulations in addition to the slope. Or, you can shim the sleepers to make them level. The solidness of the floor will depend on how you space the shims but it's easy to add more shims to make it very solid. I would not bother with a pedestal system for something like this because of the expense and height they can consume.
 
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Old 09-24-20, 04:15 PM
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Pilot Dane,
Thanks for this suggestion. Ripping the sleepers was an option I had seen discussed elsewhere. Seems a bit complicated for the reasons you mention (and the fact that I don’t own a table saw!), but worth considering.
Quick follow-up question: since the floor is coated with epoxy paint, do I still need to put some kind of waterproof barrier between the sleepers and the floor?
 
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Old 09-25-20, 04:25 AM
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I use a circular saw to rip joists to make sleepers as it's often not a straight line. I pop chalk lines on the floor where they will go then take measurements every 3-4 feet to help follow the contour of the floor.

If the epoxy is still stuck down I would assume you don't have much moisture. I'd say it's a 50/50 judgement call to do another vapor barrier but since this is the only chance you will have to install one I would do it.
 
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Old 09-25-20, 08:26 AM
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Maybe someone can enlighten me as to how that floor can be detrimental to using it for an artist studio/workshop in it's present condition. It seems like a lot of work to make it level for such a minimal amount of difference to be achieved. I must be missing something here.
 
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Old 09-25-20, 03:52 PM
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Hi Ron53,
Believe me, I’ve been weighing this myself all along, because an epoxy painted cement floor is actually ideal for a studio. Thing is, the pictures are deceptive. The slope is quite a lot more pronounced than it appears.
But maybe I’ll have to try it as is first and see how it works before laying a level floor on sleepers.
 
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