Stud to top plate connector


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Old 09-20-22, 11:48 AM
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Stud to top plate connector

I'm wondering why the connectors are nailed only into the plates but not the studs. It seems to me the nail holes are there for a reason. Should I install nails while I have the wall open or are they not necessary?

This is on a treated wood foundation; 2 x 6 studs, plywood on the outside. The house was built in 1986.


 
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Old 09-20-22, 01:51 PM
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Not really sure why they used those connectors in the first place, but to answer your question, nailing into the studs would add resistance to uplift...forces trying to lift the plate up off the studs. And probably some racking resistance as well. If you live in a high wind area, tornado or hurricane area, or an earthquake prone area, then adding the nails would provide extra resistance to those forces. If you decide to do so, make sure you use the proper metal connector nails and that they are rated for use with pressure treated lumber.
 
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Old 09-20-22, 03:17 PM
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That is a joist hanger. A incorrect bracket for that application. Maybe the stud was warped and they used it to help hold it straight. But, yea. Throw in some nails as long as you have the wall opened up. If you really want to do it right get the correct brackets.
 
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Old 09-20-22, 04:35 PM
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Wow...

I shouldn't be surprised. I've found so much stuff wrong with how this house was built, it's ridiculous.

For example, the deck ledger was attached to a cantilever, and with just a few nails and lags. The support posts were resting on patio pavers a few inches below the surface. No wonder it made horrific cracking sounds on cold nights when frost was no doubt lifting it. We're lucky it didn't blow away.

I installed new shingles a few years ago. When I removed the old starter course, the drip edge fell off, as it was only being held in place by the weight of the shingles.

I could go on.

This is how the stud to plate connections were done on the whole perimeter so it wasn't an isolated warpage problem.

I have to wonder how the inspector could have missed so many obvious issues.

I'll make corrections before I close it up. Thanks for the advice!
 
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Old 09-20-22, 04:50 PM
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My local home improvement store has quite an assortment of connectors. What is the one called that I need here?
 
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Old 09-20-22, 04:57 PM
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Simpson A34 or A35 would be the better anchor. As mentioned, anchors may not even be needed. Read the installation instructions for proper installation.
 
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Old 09-21-22, 08:18 AM
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I'll have a look at the A34 & A35 brackets, thanks.

This just occurred to me: Would the plywood that is attached to the outside of the wall serve to tie everything together? Perhaps the builder merely used the joist hangers to hold the studs in position while the plywood was being nailed.

 
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Old 09-21-22, 08:21 AM
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That's how plywood works. It's a shear panel when nailed properly.
 
 

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