Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Interior Improvement Center > Framing, Flooring and Sub-Flooring
Reload this Page >

NON-load bearing basement wall double top plate question

NON-load bearing basement wall double top plate question


  #1  
Old 02-01-23, 10:59 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 57
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
NON-load bearing basement wall double top plate question

I'm finishing my basement, and due to height, I'm doing a double top plate. due to length I will have staggered seams overlapping by 4' or more. I'm planning to stick frame, so attach the double top plate and the bottom plate, then fasten studs in the middle after. What is best and code for the double top plate. is it best to fasten both pieces together to form the full length plate, then drive screws through both pieces to the upper joists/blocking? or should they be attached one at a time (nail/screw the first top plate piece to the blocking, then attach the 2nd piece of wood to that piece)?
 
  #2  
Old 02-01-23, 12:43 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 27,751
Received 2,180 Upvotes on 1,950 Posts
A double top plate is not needed for a non-load bearing wall. If you need extra height you can buy longer studs and cut them down or double up the top or bottom plate or both as needed. How exactly to do it all depends a lot on if you are working alone or have help.

If working alone you may want to put each piece of top plate separately to minimize the weight your holding up with one hand. If you have help for lifting and holding you can double the plate before putting it up. Remember, you don't need a double plate so the doubling can be located on the floor where it's easier to work with.

If you have the room it's usually easier to frame a wall lying flat on the floor, then stand it up. This requires measuring at several points along the way since thing, especially concrete floors, are rarely perfect. You may find that the studs need to be cut to different lengths.

If you want to do the framing vertically I like to lay the top and bottom plates next to each other on the floor and mark my stud locations across both at the same time so they are identical. Then I mount the top plate first. Next use a plumb bob to transfer the location down to the floor for the bottom plate (pressure treated). Then add your studs last.
 
  #3  
Old 02-01-23, 04:54 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 14,336
Received 878 Upvotes on 741 Posts
Having a double top plate will provide you with more wood to attach drywall to at the top.
 
  #4  
Old 02-01-23, 09:13 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 9,745
Received 1,210 Upvotes on 1,098 Posts
I just build them 1/1/2" under the height from floor to bottom of joist (single top plate) tilt them up and use pieces of 2x4 and/or shims between the top of the wall and bottom of the joists to run screws through to attach,
 
  #5  
Old 02-24-23, 05:59 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 57
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I found the 104" studs, and they are the same price as the 10' studs. I may just do 10' studs and use the extra for blocking etc.

In one wall just to get it done I did 3 top plates due to the height. Hope my Electrician and Hvac installer aren't too upset with it! if its just one wall, maybe they can avoid that if needed.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: