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Structural renovation of A-Frame Cabin. GlueLam vs LVL???

Structural renovation of A-Frame Cabin. GlueLam vs LVL???


  #1  
Old 03-12-23, 09:11 PM
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Structural renovation of A-Frame Cabin. GlueLam vs LVL???



 
  #2  
Old 03-12-23, 09:13 PM
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When I added the sketch, it deleted my post so here goes again:

I’ve got an A-Frame cabin built in the 60’s with some structural ‘issues’. All the roof rafters are 6x8 Doug fir beams supporting 2x6 t&g roof sheathing. There are 5 sets of rafters that are spaced 8’ for the length of the 32’ cabin. 4 sets of rafters are tied together with rafter ties that are also supporting the second floor of the cabin. On the gable end the rafters are not tied together and the roof is splaying out approximately 2-3” on both sides.

The cabin is 24 feet wide with a 16’ opening that is unsupported (sliding patio doors). the header over the sliding door is presently only 16’ long held up by jack studs on each end. With the roof rafters splaying out, the ridge is compressing down on the center posts and putting additional pressure on the header causing it to flex onto the sliding door.

My plan is to remove the header and replace it with a HEADER / RAFTER TIE that is tied to the rafters with steel plates on each side.
prior to fitting the rafter tie/header, I will pull the rafters together with a come along before tying them together. Then replace the framing on either side of the door and reinstall the door.

My main question is regarding what material to use for the header/tie? GlueLam or LVL?

Which is stiffer to resist flexing across the opening. Since the triangle will be tied together, I’m thinking that the only weight on it should be the glass and minimal framing above.

I feel the GlueLam will resist pulling apart under the weight of the roof better and will be stronger with through bolts or lags through the steel plates. (1/4” steel).
But which will support the weight of the glass better?
Which is better on an exterior wall? Are the glues on one more suited to moisture than the other?
My preference is to use a glue lam and leave it exposed on the inside rather than have to trim out an LVL on the inside.

Any obvious flaws in my plan? Ive added a sketch for reference.
Thank you!
 
  #3  
Old 03-12-23, 09:20 PM
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Hereís a picture of the gable wall Iím talking about.
 
  #4  
Old 03-13-23, 07:44 AM
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Both glue lam and LVL are engineered or designed to a load. You just need to look at the specs for the beams you're considering and their cost. And, if it's going to be visible you need to consider appearance.

Generally I'd say LVL will be more moisture resistant if you have to leave the beam outside for a while. But, a glue lam can be had with nicer woods and in general they are better looking than LVL if you want to leave it exposed.
 
 

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