A Computer Chair with a Deep Seat Needed


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Old 07-20-13, 05:43 PM
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A Computer Chair with a Deep Seat Needed

I'm not tall or overweight, so I really don't need a "big and tall" office
chair.

My business has two workshops. One is for clean projects and the other
is for cutting plasitc, metal, wood, etc. The clean shop has large work
benches that are taller than a normal office desk.

The clean shop has desktop and laptop computers. Normally, drafting
stools are used because they can be raised higher than an office chair.

I have a problem with one of my knees. Surgery is recommended, but
the only time it really hurts is when I'm sitting in a chair that does not
support my knee. Ironically, I can stand for many hours with no pain
at all!

I purchased an inexpensive office chair and changed its dimensions in
our shop. I made a deeper seat (about 20 inches) that would support
the underside of my knees when I sit down. I made a series of small
mistakes when I tried to customize the chair. It really didn't work very
well.

I need a chair with a deep seat and optional arms. Chair arms tend to
get in the way when you're sitting at a workbench. The seat should
be at least 20 inches deep. I have a bad habit of leaning forward when
I'm sitting in a chair. I try to remember to use the backrest, but I usually
don't.

Do I have to build something in my shop, or is there a manufactured chair
that will do the job?
 
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Old 07-21-13, 04:14 AM
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I found that prior to both my knee replacements, my foot always had to be on the ground. Allowing the separation was a terror. Likewise, bending was out of the equation. So are you wanting to suspend your leg with support under the knee, or allow the foot to touch the ground? For me, an angled support from the chair down, sort of like a wheelchair leg support would have suited me better. I think we need to know what "mistakes" you made so we won't suggest the same thing. There may even be something adaptable from a hospital supply catalog that you could use.

Off topic: Have the surgery if you are bone on bone. Synvisc injections work well for a few months at a time, but as my doctor put it, there will be a day when you wake up and it doesn't work. You'll need to decide on the surgery. Best decisions I made.
 
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Old 07-22-13, 03:14 AM
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Rewinder I think what you need is what is referred to as an executive chair. I am going to give you a link to a place that only sells office furniture. They don't sell anything else and have a tremendously huge selection of office chairs officefurnitures.com.

I am not endorsing them but I did buy an executive chair from them a few years ago and it is still working well. I can't remember the price now that I paid just too long ago now but can tell you it does tilt and adjusts fairly easily for height. I had an old office chair that I used for measurements before buying my new chair as I wanted it fairly close. So I suggest you measure real well and look not only on the website I pointed to but others like Staples for instance and see what you like best. I also suggest you call each company you like and see what they suggest too.
 
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Old 07-22-13, 08:39 PM
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Thanks for the info chandler and hedgeclippers.

I've visited stores like Staples and Office Max. I know the right chair to
buy is an executive chair for big and tall people. They are very comfortable
and the seat is plenty deep. I don't know why, but I've always preferred
very simple chairs. I've never liked chairs with high backs and big arms.
It makes me feel like I can't move quickly or freely.

A very good machinist in our company built a really nice adjustable footrest
for me. It helps a little, but supporting the underside of my knee is the only
thing that helps a lot.

Recently, I visited a university that had oversized all wood chairs in their
library. No padding or cushions at all, just solid wood. The seat on these huge
chairs must have been 24 inches deep. Too big for me, but it felt good to have
that support under my knee.

It's funny chandler, I never realized how many people have knee problems,
until my right knee got clobbered. It seems like everyone I know has done
something to hurt their knees!

I really appreciate the replies. Thanks again guys.
 
 

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