painted cane on dining chairs


  #1  
Old 11-21-02, 11:01 PM
evelyna
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painted cane on dining chairs

Hi George (and anyone else who cares to reply)

I just bought a used dining room set with chairs that have a cane insert in the backrest. The cane was painted or stained at some point, and is now flaking off on the front side only. I'm planning to use a chemical paint remover to remove the flaking paint (unless you have another suggestion) and would like to know what you recommend to re-color the cane. I have never done anything like this before so any advice is appreciated. I would like to remove the paint only on the front side of the cane, since the backside looks great.

thanks for your help!
Evelyn
 
  #2  
Old 11-22-02, 03:42 PM
T
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Stripping cane

Stripping cane tends not to be recommended.
Stripping tends to take the life out of cane. Stripper is very drying and the cane will weaken considerably. Most restoration experts recommend replacing the cane. Painting cane with latex paint tends to result in flaking and chipping. Oil paint is more flexible and tends to produce better results over the long term. Many use staining gels to color caning.
 
  #3  
Old 11-22-02, 03:42 PM
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Stay away from chemicl strippers - they will undoubtedly leach through the caning and destroy the backside finish as well.

A rag dampened (not wringing wet) with lacquer thinner combined with a brass bristle brush will probably remove most of the color remaining on the front.

Your best chance of getting the color back is going to be with either acylic paints (artist) or artist oil paints. After that, you can use an aerosol lacquer ( I like Deft)to seal the color in.
 
  #4  
Old 11-24-02, 06:43 PM
L
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is the cane inserted with a spline?
if so, maybe you might want to learn how to replace the cane.
it is not that difficult.
and you will need to replace it thru the years.
small investment in tools to do the job
to "stain" the new cane i would use a spray can of coloured laquer.
 
  #5  
Old 11-24-02, 07:33 PM
evelyna
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cane insert dining chairs

Hi again,

Thanks to all of you for your input and advice. So, I finally got all the stuff I needed to do this project and had a go at it today. This doityourself thing sure takes a lot of time. Anyway, the paint that ISN'T flaking on the cane sure is stubborn. George, I must have misunderstood you, because I thought the lacquer thinner and brass brush would remove ALL the old paint, but now I think you must have meant that it would remove all the LOOSE paint. Anyway, the chair that I worked hardest on still has a little more than half the paint on the cane. The fun part (aside from taking the chairs apart-hee hee) was that on one of the chairs that had VERY little paint flaking on the front, I played with those cool oil paints that you and twelvepole said to buy. I covered up the flaked off places and kind of blended it in over the rest of the cane. It looks very good. If I can make all the chairs look like that one, I will be very happy. I haven't put the DEFT on yet, because I thought it should dry overnight. Someone told me that you can't use lacquer over oil paint--what do you say to that? Oh, leewaytoo, can you tell me what a spline is? Is that the little border around the cane that separates it from the wood of the chair?

Thanks again for your help!
Evelyn
 
  #6  
Old 11-25-02, 06:32 PM
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Evelyn:

If you thin the oil paints iwth thinner (slightly) before paplying they'll dry faster - waiting overnight is still a good idea, though.

Yes, you can apply lacquer over the oil paints you're using - I do it all the itme since I use primarily oil paints for the touchup work in my shop.

Yes, the spline is the border (impressed in a groove) that surrounds the caning. It can be removed and replaced, with, as leeway mentioned, just a few tools and a little knowhow.
 
  #7  
Old 11-26-02, 08:13 PM
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spraying laquer over oil based products is possible.
it is the drying time and the amount of thinner in the laquer that is the problem. more drying time before applying laquer.
plus remember if you use a spray can of laquer, know, that there is more ''thinner'' in the spray can, vs. what one (normally) would use in a spray ''gun''. it is the thinner that will crackle or lift your oil based undercoat. i use oil based pigments to create my ''coulour'' when doing touchups before top coating with laquer. i just do not thin my top coat (laquer) much for the first couple coats. you can use deft from a can , just buy some laquer thinner too. dip your brush into the can of laquer thinner first, letting most of the thinner drip off, then dip into the can of deft.
this helps the deft to ''flow'' smoother. its a touch situation.

ok, so much of what we have learned doing furniture restoration
is truly difficult to express without info and even then ??
because we have the experience of many pieces of work over
the years to know when to use prior experience to go in a different direction. so please give as much info as you can when posting.
 
  #8  
Old 11-26-02, 08:18 PM
L
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spraying laquer over oil based products is possible.
it is the drying time and the amount of thinner in the laquer that is the problem. more drying time before applying laquer.
plus remember if you use a spray can of laquer, know, that there is more ''thinner'' in the spray can, vs. what one (normally) would use in a spray ''gun''. it is the thinner that will crackle or lift your oil based undercoat. i use oil based pigments to create my ''coulour'' when doing touchups before top coating with laquer. i just do not thin my top coat (laquer) much for the first couple coats. you can use deft from a can , just buy some laquer thinner too. dip your brush into the can of laquer thinner first, letting most of the thinner drip off, then dip into the can of deft.
this helps the deft to ''flow'' smoother. its a touch situation.

ok, so much of what we have learned doing furniture restoration
is truly difficult to express without info and even then ??
because we have the experience of many pieces of work over
the years to know when to use prior experience to go in a different direction. so please give as much info as you can when posting.
 
 

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