Other options?


  #1  
Old 12-03-03, 10:35 PM
matkinson
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Other options?

I attempted to strip the finish and stain off a table I'm trying to refinish. I purchased a can of Bix Stripper, a plastic scrapper, steel wool and a scrub brush then went to work.

First I applied the stripper and let it dry then attempted to scrap it. I waited about a half hour. A lot of stuff flaked off but it didn't appear to remove the finish. Next, I applied more stripper to a smaller spot, let it sit a couple minutes then applied more and repeated. That didn't seem to make any more of a difference.

So my question is where do I go from here? Am I supposed to being using all my body weight to scrap off the stripper? Should I try a different product? Should I just keep at what I've been doing? Should I forget the stripping and just paint over it?

My preference is to find something to remove all the finish and stain so I can restain. If that isn't possible my next choose would be to paint it all black but I like the look of the stain more. I'm not crazy about antiquing (not that I don't like it. The piece just wouldn't fit with the rest of the room).

What's the best bet?
Thanks!
 
  #2  
Old 12-04-03, 12:41 AM
Furniture Bldr
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Well, it appears as though you have answered your own question. You only let the stripper sit on it for a "few mins" before you started to scrape it off. You need to let it sit longer than that. You need to wait til its bubbled up all over the place before you start to scrap stuff off. Any clue as to what type of finish is on it? Poly's are harder to strip than lacquers.

Dont use any stripper that has that nice citrusy smell, as it's only taking away from the strength. When you're done stripping it, wipe it all down with lacquer thinner to neturalize the acids in the stripper. let dry 24 hours then sand
 
  #3  
Old 12-04-03, 10:06 AM
brickeyee
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Look for a striper that contains methylene chloride. It is dangerous stuff, so use it only outdoors. The ‘semi paste’ strippers work better. Wear rubber gloves (not laytex). Apply the stripper rather thick. Cover with aluminum foil. Wait about 10 minutes and check. The old finish should be bubbling off the surface. If it is not bubbling everywhere, put the foil back and wait 10 more minutes. Scrape off everything that will come off. If some finish still remains, apply another coat of stripper. Wipe down with paint thinner to remove any wax left from the stripper.
Methylene chloride is not flammable, though other things in the stripper are flammable. Methylene chloride can cause trouble for people with any type of heart problems. Use it outdoors, wear rubber gloves, and rinse any off that gets on you quickly. You will want to anyway because it causes a burning feeling if it gets on bare skin. Eye protection is also required.
 
  #4  
Old 12-04-03, 11:28 AM
matkinson
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Furniture Builder,

I left the stripper on for a half an hour in my first attempt. Then applied it again, in 2-3 minute intervals, for another 15 minutes. The can states "tough spots may require several minutes before scrapping". I read in a couple places on-line that I'm supposed to keep the piece wet with stripper while I wait for it to do its thing. Even when I did that it took a lot of effort to even get a little of the finish off (I have no idea what was used on it in the first place). Did I underestimate the manual effort of stripping? the pictures on the can make it look like everything just slides right off

Brickeyee,

Thanks for the instructions. I don't think working out doors is really an option for me (I live in an apartment complex & in NH where its been snowing) at least for now. Would methylene chloride be an option indoors in a well ventilated room?
 
  #5  
Old 12-04-03, 11:35 AM
matkinson
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Furniture Builder,

I left the stripper on for a half an hour in my first attempt. Then applied it again, in 2-3 minute intervals, for another 15 minutes. The can states "tough spots may require several minutes before scrapping". I read in a couple places on-line that I'm supposed to keep the piece wet with stripper while I wait for it to do its thing. Even when I did that it took a lot of effort to even get a little of the finish off (I have no idea what was used on it in the first place). Did I underestimate the manual effort of stripping? the pictures on the can make it look like everything just slides right off

Brickeyee,

Thanks for the instructions. I don't think working out doors is really an option for me (I live in an apartment complex & in NH where its been snowing) at least for now. Would methylene chloride be an option indoors in a well ventilated room?
 
  #6  
Old 12-04-03, 12:25 PM
phantom1874
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
You need to start off right,or you will run into problems.The piece you are working on plus the room temperature and the stripper should be close to 65 to 75 degrees.Any colder then that your stripper will not work properly.Once your temperature is estabilished,the first thing I would do is clean with a household cleaner,to remove any build up grime.Your stripper is not made to remove grime.The next step I would do is wash it down with paint thinner to remove any wax or silicon.You don't want any wax or silicon on your wood cause it will then be harder to remove,plus it will contaminate your wood and finish.Silicon and wax are the refinishers nightmare.There is no such thing as a over kill,when it comes to refinishing.
 
  #7  
Old 12-04-03, 12:46 PM
brickeyee
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
A fan in the open window blowing out and another window open usually does it. The cold will slow the solvent evaporation down, so do not worry to much. See http://www.bixmfg.com/Stripper%20TDS.htm for the long instructions from BIX. Covering the stripper with foil helps slow the evaporation of the solvents even more. BIX is 15-25% methylene chloride (aka dichloromethane) so it sounds like it probably needs more time to work and a lot more stripper. A ¼ inch thick layer (or as thick as it will puddle if less than 1/4) is a good start.
 
  #8  
Old 12-08-03, 10:46 AM
matkinson
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Smile What a difference!

I tried stripping again and had much more luck this time. Seems my down fall was not using enough stripper. Good tip brickeyee to use a quarter inch!
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: