acrylic latex advice for furniture


  #1  
Old 10-29-04, 10:33 AM
deniseorjohn
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acrylic latex advice for furniture

I am still working on my old 1920's bedroom set that originally was factory painted and want to redo it. I've stripped it and primed it, but having difficulty spraying it with latex. The paint I am using is BM Aqua Glo semi-gloss. I was told by someone else to use 100% acrylic latex and this Aqua Glo is proprietary latex (whatever that means). Is this not what i want? I was told by another person to try BM Impervo on this wood, although it's a satin and this set is for a girl's room. The Impervo is 100% acrylic latex enamal (the BM website says). Which would be best on furniture that will be used a lot? Is there something to topcoat the paint with for wear? Also, I am using a general purpose Campbell Hausfeld air sprayer and am thinking, after researching, maybe trying the Wagner conversion sprayer. I assum the conversion sprayer will be a little different than just an air sprayer? I have the compression tank already. Any help on paint and application is greatly appreciated! I am a novice, but love to work with my hands. Thanks!!!
 
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Old 10-29-04, 11:54 AM
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What problem are you having spraying?

Acrylic latex paint works well on furniture. I have used it on high chairs, cribs, baby beds, and other items with great success. No other coating necessary. On a mechanically sound, clean surface: prime and apply two finish coats. Benjamin Moore makes excellent paints. I have used the box store Valspar American Tradition latex, semi-gloss; and have had excellent results.
 
  #3  
Old 10-29-04, 01:28 PM
deniseorjohn
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I am looking for a very smooth surface as was the original surface which must have been a lacquer or something - it was difficult to remove down to bare wood. I don't want brush marks and the BM Aqua Glo left brush marks after using a Purdy brush. Someone suggested to try rolling it on and then brush it out, but it was very thick, dried quickly and left ridges. In spraying, I'm having prickly texture on one end of the fluid control and then an orange peel affect if I turn the knob the other way. I haven't found an inbetween spray that is laying nice. I haven't been filtering the paint because I didn't know too until the other day. So, I have the filters but haven't tried painting yet as I'm so frustrated at sanding down what I apply. BM paint can says to thin only with water and that still left prickly texture on the wood. I know I have to sand, but what do I do for the final smooth layer of paint? If I hand paint, what's the best way to do that without ridges? Thin paint a lot, try the BM Impervo? Someone wrote to use a mohair roller and then use a Purdy brush. I'm frustrated with this. Thanks!
 
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Old 10-29-04, 11:38 PM
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Are you spraying on primed wood? Sand the primer smooth before the finish coat is applied. Use a good primer such as Zinsser 123.

Are you using a tip rated for latex? The matching needle?

Assuming this is a high pressure, low volume rig, you might try making less air pressure. It sounds as if it is drying too fast. Watch the ambient temperature and any cross ventilation from fans.

You can generally thin 10 - 15% with water. The coat should go on wet and flow together.

When you have sprayed latex before, were you running as much pressure as now?

Do strain the paint, even the best has trash in it to clog the gun.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 10-30-04, 08:44 AM
deniseorjohn
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Yes, the wood is primed. I primed it with Kilz and the air sprayer. The primer seemed to come out better from the sprayer, although it was not as smooth as I had hope, but with sanding it looks nice. The latex is another story. I only have one tip with my general purpose sprayer (I use the interal mix). I assume there's a difference between HVLP and just a general purpose air sprayer? I'm thinking of purchasing a HVLP conversion gun (Wagner has one that seems to have good reviews and they mention diff. tips). So, I guess that's the biggest problem is not having a correct tip and having too much pressure? (I've adjusted the tank from 30 psi up to 46 psi and can't find any point that works).

Also, this BM Aqua Glo says "propietary latex". How is that different than "100% acrylic latex enamel"? Should I use something else than Aqua Glo? I need something to stand up to a child.
Thanks so much!
 
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Old 10-30-04, 11:19 AM
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Primer is often rough on wood. Sanding makes it smooth so the finish coat will flow on.

General purpose spray tips and such are not well suited for painting. Specific tips and needles are specified for different paints to help achieve better results.

I find that some thinning is always beneficial.

Proprietary means it contains a trade secret chemical or formula. 100% acrylic latex means that is it not part something else. Although, I don't what the else might be. Enamel is a term that generally applies to a smooth finish paint and has nothing to do with what brand of paint or its being alkyd or latex. Folks generally think of enamel when they think of gloss finishes.

I suspect that Benjamin Moore paints will be durable enough for a child.

I don't use high pressure spraying equipment, so I have no specific recommendations about it. I am looking at the results. The high flow rate of the air in a high pressure system may have a lot to do with rapid drying.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 10-30-04, 12:31 PM
deniseorjohn
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Thanks so much. I have been researching for an affordable hightly recommended HVLP conversion gun to use with my air compressor and it seems the Wagner Conversion gun is highly recommended and I can get different spray tips, the #4 being suitable for latex. So, I think I'll go that route and keep the BM Aqua Glo to try and also strain the paint, which I was not doing. Thanks again for answering my questions.
 
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Old 10-30-04, 06:41 PM
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Good luck. I think that any of us who have done much painting has seen the odd problematic project.

I painted a table four times for a man. It never turned out right. I sanded it off and gave it back to him. I had never had any trouble of this nature before. I think it was the paint and the color blend that made it such a problem to finish properly. After stripping it, priming it, and painting it over and over, I was disheartened. I hated to think of all the hours that had been invested in that job. Some things just are not to be.
 
  #9  
Old 03-14-05, 05:12 PM
deniseorjohn
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update

Well, after several months to regain myself, I bought an HVLP sprayer and thinned the BM Aqua Glo quite a bit. I have to thin about 50% to get a real nice smooth finish on the wood. It looks nice for an amateur. I hope I'm not ruining the integrity of the paint by thinning that much, but it's the only way to get a smooth finish. It does finally look nice.
 
 

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