Refinishing Woodwork in 1929 Home

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-24-05, 07:10 AM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Strongsville, Ohio
Posts: 57
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Refinishing Woodwork in 1929 Home

Hi,

I've started a project in the city of Akron, Ohio. It's in a home built in 1929 and a good portion of the trim around the windows, doors, and baseboards has been painted with at least one coat of paint. The homeowner wants to restore the woodwork to it's original condition. The stain used is a dark walnut. I must say that the wood that's been stripped to this point is beautiful. I'm looking for suggestions to aid in the refinishing process... stripper to use, either chemical or mechanical, tools and accessories that will assist, sanding in tight corners and irregular shapes, and other good things like that. I did use a chemical stripper that works in 15 minutes. I could only apply so much to the vertical surfaces, otherwise the goop started to drip off. It only removed one coat of paint per application.

Any ideas or recommendations will be appreciated.

Respectfully,

Handy Matt
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-24-05, 04:43 PM
K
Member
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Posts: 295
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Peel-Away is your friend

Having done the same thing, I have to say that the BEST product/device is the Peel-Away line of strippers. It's a frosting consistency and will take off multiple layers--but it is slow. It comes with a paper backed top layer that has many advantages, chiefly, less mess and all the old (likely lead) paint is contained therein. It also helps the stripper penetrate. I think the product for old trim is Peel-Away 7-but you might want to check their website (no idea what the address is).

To get paint from the recesses, unless you have a machinist friend who will make you specially shaped tools, Lee Valley Hardware carries a set of stripping tools and another set of dental tools. The stripping tools come in a variety of shapes to get the paint out, and the dental tools are great for small areas. Lee Valley also carries some specialty sanding blocks for recessed trim that work pretty well, although for most trim a foam sanding block (the reusable ones) work almost as well.
 
  #3  
Old 03-25-05, 09:37 AM
E
ennovy88
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I agree with Kimeyers..........peel away is definitely the way to go..I stripped the banisters and posts in my home (built in 1927), which have detailed trim, ornate finial and recessed molding as well... ...so u can imagine the many paint layers....I used peel away and a 5 in 1 tool which I purchased from Home Depot and the tool is actually called the 5 in 1...which aids in working in crevices and tight spots....good luck.
 
  #4  
Old 03-25-05, 04:56 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Strongsville, Ohio
Posts: 57
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you for the feedback. I'll check into those items and see what I can come up with. I live about one mile from a Home Depot, which makes it convenient.

Handy Matt
 
  #5  
Old 03-25-05, 08:06 PM
K
Member
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Posts: 295
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Matt,
You will not find Peel Away at the Depot. Find the website, and either order on-line, or find a local distributor.
 
  #6  
Old 03-26-05, 08:36 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Strongsville, Ohio
Posts: 57
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I contacted Peel Away through their web site and got a quick response. I was told they distribute their product through Sherwin-Williams. There are several of those close by. I won't be going there tomorrow, because it's Easter, but I will be stopping by on Monday. Thank you.

Handy Matt
 
  #7  
Old 03-31-05, 06:11 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Strongsville, Ohio
Posts: 57
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Refinishing Update

I had a chance to learn more about the refinishing process. I went looking for Peel Away at Sherwin-Williams. I found 'Peel Away 1' and thought I'd be able to use that for my project. After reading the fine print on the container I found out that this product could darken hardwoods and it was recommended to use 'Peel Away 7'. I went back to Sherwin-Williams and asked for 'Peel Away 7'. As I was discussing my situation with the sales clerk he told me about another product, Ready-Strip by Back to Nature Products. After asking about the pricing and looking at the descriptions on the product containers I ended up purchasing Ready-Strip.

'Peel Away 1' cost about $27 per 1.25 gallons. 'Peel Away 7' cost about $60 per gallon. And Ready-Strip cost $25 per gallon.

I used Ready-Strip and it worked well. It was very thick and applied easily with a brush. It clung to the vertical surfaces nicely, with running of the product in only a few spots. I put the product on rather thickly at first, and then a little thinner later. I should have stayed with the thick application. It removed more paint. I waited almost 24 hours to scrape off the paint and it came off nicely and, overall, cleanly. Ready-Strip is environmentally friendly and didn't have the strong odor of other removers I've tried.

Handy Matt
 
  #8  
Old 07-06-05, 11:55 AM
E
Member
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 28
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Follow-up question

Did the Ready-Strip handle the dust (and potential lead exposure) like the others suggested that Peel-Away would?
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: