Stripping and oiling Oak table


  #1  
Old 07-24-05, 01:25 PM
Eister
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Question Stripping and oiling Oak table

I have a 15 year old Oak pedestal table that has been coated in either varnish or laquer which has a bleach tone to it. I have been using Circa 1850 Furnisher Stripper and it is coming off, but slowly and not very well in the grooves of the grain. I'm thinking I should probably buy a gel type remover and see if that works better. I am hoping to get away with just doing the actual table top and leaf. I think the edges, pedestal etc. would be waaay too complicated for me....plus the chairs are a darker and different wood anyway.
Whenever I manage to strip the top I would like to finish with just an oil, as I understand you don't have to worry about water marks etc. and can just re-oil to keep the finish nice. This works well for a friend who has a Teak table and am hoping you think this will work well with an Oak table too.

Any suggestions as to which stripper or oil I should be using for the best result would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 07-26-05, 04:18 AM
C
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I use strypeeze or other similar methylene chloride stripper. I prefer the semi-paste because it does not run so much. Be sure to let it sit and work before removing it. Follow the instructions on the can for neutralizing the stripper.

Resistance to damage from water is more a function of the thickness of the film rather than the product used. Oil finishes are simple to renew, just add another coat. Thin finishes such as oil are easier to apply, since you wipe on, wipe off, until you build the thickness you desire. 100% pure tung oil is a good, reliable product.

Hope this helps.
 
  #3  
Old 07-26-05, 10:10 AM
Eister
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Thanks very much for the advise....could I bother you one more time?!

Tung Oil was out of stock until tomorrow, so the store suggested Circa 1850 Tung 'N Teak Oil as a substitute.
Being a dining table water/heat protection is important to me and I haven't opened it yet, so should I go back and exchange it for the straight Tung Oil?
 
  #4  
Old 07-26-05, 07:01 PM
C
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I prefer pure tung oil to the mixes. Wait until you can get what you want. The table will be around for a long time.
 
 

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