Refinishing Table, Finish Underside?


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Old 01-04-06, 12:26 PM
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Refinishing Table, Finish Underside?

I am sanding down a dining room table. I expected the table surface to be a veneer, but was pleasantly surprised to find that that starburst pattern was solid wood.

Anyway, should I do anything with the underside of the table? Obviously no one will see it but is there a benifit to sealing the underside?

FWIW, I think the table is oak, but I am no expert. The grain is very straight and tight. Its a dull red and sands fairly easily. Thanks for any help....
 
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Old 01-04-06, 01:18 PM
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urbsnspices, Welcome to the DIY Forums.
I am not the expert here but I have always believed that real wood should be able to breathe. I have never seen a piece of wood furniture finished on the undersides. Watch this post for the expert opinions and answers. Good luck with your project.
 
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Old 01-04-06, 06:07 PM
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Tables are rarely finished on the bottom side but I believe it is more a cost saving measure than anything else. Not to contradict majakdragon but I believe the wood should be stable and not need to 'breathe' since it has been indoors and not subject to weather/humidity changes.

I bought an unfinished dining rm table several years ago and applied 1 coat of poly to the underside. Solid wood table, forgot the name of the wood but it was the type of trees that they used to produce rubber from.

What it boils down to is if you feel like finishing the underside - go for it, if not that is perfectly fine too.
 

Last edited by marksr; 01-05-06 at 06:48 AM. Reason: typo
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Old 01-05-06, 04:33 AM
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Thanks for the input. I have seen a few tables that have the underside coated. But, it is hard to tell if it was purposeful or just overspray from the manufacturing process.
 
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Old 01-05-06, 07:28 AM
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No doubt, no equivocation it's the gospel truth...

FINISH THE UNDERSIDE!!! At least put a sealer on it.

This is especially critical with solid wood. Finishing the top only leaves the bottom exposed to humidity which can cause the boards to warp and even crack due to one side swelling and contracting as the humidity changes.

Save yourself a lot of grief down the road - a sealer coat takes but a few minutes and very little material cost and can save you big bucks in the years ot come.
 
 

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