Help with lacquer finish


  #1  
Old 01-13-06, 07:40 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 2
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Help with lacquer finish

I refinished my dining table and chairs with a black spray lacquer (Rustoluem brand). I followed the instructions, and for the most part it looks really good. However, the table top is not smooth like it should be. Other areas like the legs and chairs turned out great, but the table top is rough. I put on two coats of black lacquer and then two coats of clear. What can I do to get the top as smooth as I want it? Did I just not cover the top well enough? Do I need to spray on the clear lacquer really thick? Will polish help? Also I'm concerned about the lacquer chipping. Will more coats of lacquer make it less likely to chip? Would another product be better? Can I put another product on top of the lacquer? (Sorry I have so many questions.)
 
  #2  
Old 01-13-06, 08:14 PM
mako's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Wake Forest
Posts: 449
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Never apologize for too many questions, that's just what you need to do when you're stumped. I'll see if I can hit the points tit-for-tat.


>>>

Sounds more like an enamel to me than a lacquer. That's a good thing, enamel is more durable.


>>>

Sounds like you may not have sanded the top smooth enough. Finish sand with 150 or 180, maybe even 220, if using a spray enamel since it doesn't sand too well like lacquer sanding sealer. If you have a power sander available, like a small quarter-sheet sander (I recommend the Bosch highly for $50). Hit the table (ie, over the stuff you just sprayed, the entire surface) with 120, 150, 180, 220. Should be nice and smooth. Use a lot of sandpaper, it will likely "corn" up on you. Use a putty knife to clean the corns out a good bit. This is a pain but necessary. I do it all the time!


>>

Bad idea. Spray a nice wet coat, but not so much it piles up. Spray it so it lays downs smoothly. Enamels and lacquers both do not like thick coats. May look good for a while, but thicker coats are MUCH more prone to ding and chipping. Trust me on this!

>>
Not for the rough problem. But once your table is fully cured for a week or two and the paint smell isn't as noticeable, you can hit the table with a good paste wax like Minwax Paste Wax.

>>
More coats, as mentioned above = wailing and gnashing of teeth. Four coats, five maximum (three black two clear).

>>

Yes, Eurobild by ML Campbell. Catalyzed polyurethane. Cost about $175 for a gallon of the stuff with the sealer, catalyst and reducer. Say another $400 for spray equipment, $900-$2000 for a good spray hood exhaust since the stuff is quite toxic when wet, and $30 for a respirator. Lol, in other words, you're doing just what you need to be right now! Had I not been a cabinet maker I'd be usin Rustoleum on my stuff too.

>>

Just a good paste wax once cured for a couple of weeks.



Hope this helps!


Matt
 
  #3  
Old 01-14-06, 06:50 PM
L
Member
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: us
Posts: 260
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
spraying a large surface with a spray can can be difficult, for you
can end up with overspray that drys and creates the rough surface.

i looked up rustoleum products and did you use the gloss black lacquer
then top coat with the clear gloss lacquer?

i would have two cans shook up and start spraying with one can
while shaking up the second can with my off hand, in order to
have the second can ready to spray.

i would double coat the surface, by spraying one direction then
perpendicular to the first coat.
hopefully you can reach across the table with out dragging your shirt
in the laquer.

if the table can be pulled apart for leaves, then do one half at a time,
cover the second half while spraying the first half. let the first half
dry before spraying the second half inorder to be able to cover the first
half.


if you still have some roughness from spraying the black, lightly sand
with 320, then top coat with clear, double coating for a wet finish.

spay cans generally do not place as much finish on the surface because
of the thinner needed to get the lacquer out the nozzel.

which is why, if i use the spray cans i use flat black, for it covers better,
then i top coat with whatever clear sheen i want, with gloss being the
strongest.

if you use a paste wax then you can not respray the surface untill all wax
has been removed, which usually means stripping.

check out johnson paste wax, i believe it is cheaper and does the
same thing, at ace hardware.
 
  #4  
Old 01-14-06, 07:36 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 2
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
In response to leewaytoo: Yes, I put on two coats of the gloss black lacquer and then two coats of the clear lacquer. I think you are right about the overspray, because I did not get the roughness on smaller areas (like my chairs).
My plan of attack now is to lightly sand and put on two coats of clear lacquer in the manner you directed. The table cannot be pulled apart for leaves, but it is small so I was thinking of propping the table on its side when I spray so that I can hold the can upright (rather than pointed down). Is that a good idea or will that make a wet coat drip?
Thanks.
 
  #5  
Old 01-17-06, 06:32 AM
L
Member
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: us
Posts: 260
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
i was busy yesterday,

i would not turn the table on its side, you will get runs with a wet dbl
coat
since it is small just dbl coat it while upright.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: