Distressed Furniture, Layers Of Colored Paint


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Old 01-29-06, 08:27 AM
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Distressed Furniture! Layers Of Colored Paint

I want to distress a piece of furniture so that different recent painted layers are shown from the surface. I painted about 20 layers of paint of all sorts of colors. How can i achieve a distressed, peeled paint look so I can see different paint layers under neath. perhaps sand paper. a chisel- putting light pressure scrapping to take of some of the layers ofpaint in a specific area.

I would think it is more difficult to distress the long flat continuous area of the furniture, then the edges/corners of the piece of furniture which I would think then sand paper would be the best....
what about heat gun, paint stripper/removal?
thanks
reknnj
 

Last edited by reknnj; 01-31-06 at 11:12 AM. Reason: revised-more precise and clear
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Old 01-30-06, 06:55 AM
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There are several techniques to achieve this type of finish. For instance you can use wax on certain spots to keep the top layer of paint from adhering. You can sand back layers once dry, or you can wipe away the top layer before it dries. It all depends on what you are trying to achieve.
 
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Old 01-30-06, 09:15 AM
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distressed furniture

Originally Posted by kimeyers
There are several techniques to achieve this type of finish. For instance you can use wax on certain spots to keep the top layer of paint from adhering. You can sand back layers once dry, or you can wipe away the top layer before it dries. It all depends on what you are trying to achieve.
wiping off the top layer before it dries will give a more glazed look. I want to achieve a more rustic distreeded look hwere I can see chipped of underneath paint. I am not sure how the wax will work unless you are putting a stripping solution and the solution does not effect the waxed areas?

I was think of either using- heat gun, scraper/chisel, stripper solution in areas? Juswt not sure. the glazing I would like to do in areas ones I achieve the other effect.
thank for any additional help
ron
 
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Old 01-30-06, 09:53 AM
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use sand paper. it mimics years of wear which would show the colors/layers/wood underneath.
 
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Old 01-31-06, 05:09 AM
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destressing furniture

Originally Posted by Annette
use sand paper. it mimics years of wear which would show the colors/layers/wood underneath.
with sanding will I actual beable to get to different layers, so that there are different colors creating a distressed look. do you recommend
using s chisel as well. thanks for your help
ron
 
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Old 01-31-06, 06:48 AM
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a chisel??? how thick do you think layers of paint are?? no - do not use a chisel. only sandpaper to gently expose the underlying color.

think about old furniture. first it was stained. then it was painted one color. then another. then another. over the years, the edges get worn, corners get bumped, the areas around drawer pulls get worn. all this wear slowly exposes the colors underneath. that's what you want to mimic. you don't want to wait 50 years for it to happen on its own, so you speed up the wear & tear with sandpaper.
 
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Old 01-31-06, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Annette
a chisel??? how thick do you think layers of paint are?? no - do not use a chisel. only sandpaper to gently expose the underlying color.

think about old furniture. first it was stained. then it was painted one color. then another. then another. over the years, the edges get worn, corners get bumped, the areas around drawer pulls get worn. all this wear slowly exposes the colors underneath. that's what you want to mimic. you don't want to wait 50 years for it to happen on its own, so you speed up the wear & tear with sandpaper.
thanks so much. When I said a chisel I just ment with light pressure scrapping/taking of the paint in a spesific area, the paint layers.

I want to take the paint layers off in different areas which is more difficult to do since it is a continuous flat area, then the edges/corners of the piece.
ron
 
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Old 01-31-06, 11:21 AM
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Ron, what look are you trying to achieve? I don't recall having ever seen a furniture item with multiple layers of paint all over. Are you going to use a crackle application? Annette's right, most furniture pieces are distressed/weathered where they would be naturally. Do not use an ice pick or chisel, or a heat gun, unless of course you are going for the totally destroyed look.
 
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Old 02-02-06, 07:40 PM
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Originally Posted by kimeyers
Ron, what look are you trying to achieve? I don't recall having ever seen a furniture item with multiple layers of paint all over. Are you going to use a crackle application? Annette's right, most furniture pieces are distressed/weathered where they would be naturally. Do not use an ice pick or chisel, or a heat gun, unless of course you are going for the totally destroyed look.
no i am not going for that totally destroyed look....I have to say I giggled out loud.
I quess i am not explaing my self.you have a piece of furniture that has top and sides, this top and side creates corners and depending on moldings and chrm can be easily sanded with sand paper because it is a corner a hard surface.

I want to distress the top and side as well showing the underlying paint in spots. how would i do this with out having it look blotchy. do you inderstand what i want to do.
taking layers of from edges of the piece is easy. doing it on a flat surface such as the top or side of the piece is going to be difficult.
 
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Old 02-03-06, 08:35 AM
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"taking layers of from edges of the piece is easy. doing it on a flat surface such as the top or side of the piece is going to be difficult"

you just have to work the piece until you get the look you want.

use whatever tools you can think of. you can always putty/repaint an area.

use your "heavy" tools first then use various grades of sandpaper last.

then top coat if you want or not. if not, it will "wear" easier as you

use the piece.
 
 

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