Flush Passage Doors interior re-finishing or removing scratches?


  #1  
Old 03-16-06, 08:25 PM
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Question Flush Passage Doors interior re-finishing or removing scratches?

I have a total of 11 interior flushed passage doors, they are all finished with what it seems to semi-gloss poly cherry looking stain combo, not sure because I don't even know what wood type the doors are made of, you can see the grains in the wood and I do like the cherry color that it has. If the doors did not have some scratches near the mid bottom section I would leave them as it is. But the scratches are making the doors look unappealing. I would like to remove the scratches or at least minimize the obvious scratches but am not sure what would work best? I am a first timer at this and the doors have been this way for a long time since I purchased my home.
So my main concerns are:
**If removing the scratches on these types of doors is not easy then would refinishing them be a better choice? I can not strip them because they really don't have much to strip off, it seems like they are the original doors from the home and only had a thin layer of poly stain applied.

**I only have the scratches near the mid- bottom and would rather correct that area without changing so much the color but instead blending it somehow. I honestly am not sure if I can get the doors back to this color so I am wondering what is a better choice to correct the scratches on these type of doors? Sanding it is not a good choice I think because they are hollow doors and well don't have much wood to sand.
**Also one of the doors has a small punch like hole that is in the interior part of a closet so its not obvious unless opened but can this be repair? If so with what product?
Any information would be greatly appreciated!! Definitely would like an answer to this soon.
Thanks!
 
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Old 03-17-06, 05:37 AM
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are the scratches through to the bare wood?

if not try using a lint free white rag dampened with paint thinner and wipe
on the areas that are scratched.

do they seem to disapear?

if so, then you could scuff the whole side of the door with a
scotch green pad and a degreaser. let dry and wipe off all residue with
a tack rag.

then apply an acrylic finish to the door using a pad applicator

if the scratches are all the way through to the bare wood and
lighter in colour, then you need to create/find a stain to match the
existing colour and apply to the scratches after using the green pad and degreaser
and tacking. then apply the acrylic finish.

matching the stain is the hardest part of the process.

as to the hole.

i repaired a pool table's pedestal that had had a cue stick's butt
poked through it. i was able to bevel the inside of the hole and the outside of the hole,
using 60 grit and then i looped a piece of string through
same 60 grit paper cut down to an inch or two larger than
the diameter of the hole. i then pushed the paper through
the hole and using the string pulled back to where it
was flush with the inside of the hole. i then used
minwax two part putty and filled the hole, making sure
to over fill the inside and simply pulled the string
towards me to spread it out on the inside.
it drys quickly and after drying i used a razor blade
to cut off the string and then carefully sanded
the area and then touched up to colour and top
coated.
 

Last edited by leewaytoo; 03-17-06 at 05:49 AM.
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Old 03-17-06, 10:26 AM
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I agree but I would be leary of using a latex poly if the doors have oil base poly/varnish on them.
 
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Old 03-21-06, 08:57 AM
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Question 1 step polyshades product??

I don't know what type of wood these flush doors are made of, just know that the finish is a cherry color finish with a semi gloss on one side and nothing just stain in the interior side of the closets. So its difficult for me to know what stain I should use on them. I would not mind changing the color a little if necessary for consistency in the color tone. But I am clueless on what is the correct product to use over what it has now. I read about a tinted polyurethane product by minwax that will tint and provide a shine, is that feasible for my door situation? or not? It said no prep needed on already finished wood.

If I could use this product, what type of filler should I put in the deeper scratches, should it be wood putty or wood filler?? What is the difference? The deeper scratches lifted up some of the wood grain. Any suggestion with this is greatly appreciated!

Thanks in advance for any help!
 
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Old 03-21-06, 10:12 AM
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use wood putty vs wood filler

wood filler is for filling the grain to create a smooth piano finish.

cross grain scratches are the hardest to "touch up"

you will have to experiment with your colour.

try oil based paint that an artist would use, comes in little tubes.
apply thinly.

you might have to mix two or more colours to get the colour you need.

if you go the tinted poly route, use a set of doors that are seldom seen
to pratice on. and use a pad applicator vs a brush, if the doors are flat
vs. having raised panels. or use both if raised.
 
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Old 03-21-06, 10:42 AM
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It is hard to stain already stained/sealed wood. If the scratches are through the finish and into the wood they will take stain to color them but the groove or dent will still be there.

Although I don't agree with only finishing the exterior side of closet doors I used to work for a company that considered that SOP. Most homes built with flat doors used luan or birch. Luan is the most common as it is the cheapest.

Obviously I have not seen the doors but I believe I would first lightly sand them [with direction of grain only] and then apply 1 coat of clear poly/varnish. You will then be better able to judge what further work [if any] needs to be done. Colored putty is great for deep scratches. As leewaytoo noted you may have to mix different colors of putty togther to get the right shade.

Polyshades would be a good product to slightly change the color of the wood but I would be leary of using it on the back side of the doors with no finish.
 
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Old 03-21-06, 07:01 PM
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The doors are flushed with no raised paneling so I guess using a pad applicator is ok. I think I will do a test on one of the doors with tinted polyshade.

About the scratches yes they are across the grain and I imagine it would be difficult to remove, but I will use the wood putty as you suggested to try to make it less obvious.

About the interior side of the closet door, they do have stain just don't have any polyurethane on them. So I am guessing that a color test would be best, one thing, if I sand it a little what sanding number should I use? I don't think I need to sand it too much since they are hollow doors which can be delicate to sanding.

Should I sand lightly and then use the tinted poly?
 
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Old 03-22-06, 05:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Mercedes1R
About the interior side of the closet door, they do have stain just don't have any polyurethane on them. So I am guessing that a color test would be best, one thing, if I sand it a little what sanding number should I use? Should I sand lightly and then use the tinted poly?


I wouldn't use tinted poly on the backside of the closet doors - at least not for the first coat. Because they are unsealed they will soak up the poly at a faster rate thus giving them more color out of the tinted poly [they may come out too dark]

Use 220 grit sand paper, always sand with the direction of the grain. A light sanding should be all that is required.
 
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Old 03-22-06, 09:27 AM
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if there are no scratches on the inside do not sand at all
you will sand through the stain.
just wipe with a tack rag and top coat.

if there are scratches, top coat first then fill the scratches with the putty.
then touchup and topcoat.

as to the scratches on the front of the doors.

have you been able to find a tinted poly shade that matches or is close
to the original colour?

if so,

fill the scratches and sand smooth with 220 lightly so as not to sand through
the existing finish.

use an artist's brush, small, to paint on Clear finish over the sanded putty.

after dry, use the brush to apply the tinted poly Only to the area over the
putty, Lightly.

stay on the lighter side, going darker than the existing finish will look like
you used a black magic marker on the door.

separate,
you can add minwax stain to minwax clear poly, just cant add to much.
you can mix different colour stains to get the colour you want then add to
the clear poly to create your touch up colour.

you can use acrylic over poly or for that matter over anything except for a
waxed surface.

it will not lift the previous finish.
it drys faster.
you can use a blow dryer carefully from a distance to force dry the finish
for touchup only.

any finish will scratch if abused.
 

Last edited by leewaytoo; 03-22-06 at 09:42 AM.
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Old 03-23-06, 07:27 AM
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Question Is there a Easier Method for doing this??

Thanks to all who replied. It all seems more complicated than I first thought it would be. Is there a easy method, which a non-experience wood re-finishing person like myself can do? I just want to reduce the unsightly across the grain scratches and perhaps change the color slightly if needed for uniformity. All my 11 flush interior doors have different stains of cherry from what I can see, some are richer more orange like and others lighter not as orange and others more deeper walnut red color. What a mess, I purchase my home with the doors like that, so I am clueless as to how to approach this project. I just want uniformity in stain color throughout my home and reduction in scratch appearances if possible. Plus nice looking results that can be easily wipe off from dust etc during cleaning without damaging the wood.

I am doing this project alone because hubby does not want to take any risk in damaging them, so if it turns out aweful I am the responsible one! That is why I am seeking assistance in this forum to make the correct choices.

Any suggestion on easier methods is greatly appreciated!!
 
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Old 03-23-06, 09:45 AM
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First lightly sand all the varnish/poly. Then recoat with a tinted poly [minwax polyshades], be sure to apply evenly. Once dry you can better assess what [if anything] needs to be done to repair the damage. Most deep scratches will need to be puttied with color putty. This comes in little jars [differnt colors] and is usually on the same shelf [or nearby] as poly & stains. You will probably need a couple different colors to match the wood. The different colors of putty can be mixed together to further customize the color.

I doubt that you will mess the doors up any. The key is to apply an even coat of poly. 1 or 2 thin coats is better than 1 coat with runs, unsightly brush marks or lap marks. Since you won't be getting any help you won't have to share the praise when the doors come out looking better than they do now.
 
 

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