stripping wood panels


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Old 03-21-06, 04:27 AM
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stripping wood panels

I own an old fisherman house in Florida. All interior walls are made of cypress panels treated with something dark. House is old, made in the 50ies so I have no clue what were they using at that time.. I would like to strip the wood and white wash it. Will give a nice ďbeachyĒ look. What kind of stripper to use on vertical large walls? I know it sounds crazy but Iím willing to try. Any help is appreciated!
 
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Old 03-23-06, 07:16 AM
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are you sure it has been stained and top coated?

have you tried to strip a small area yet?
or sand a small area?

cypress unfinished, grey's with age.

is the grain a uniform pattern?
or is it "pecky cypress"

stripping in place will be messy.
what are the floors?

have you tried scuffing a small area, (if it has finish) that is out of the way and
then tacked and then use a white wash over that scuffed area.

if stripping is the best way to go for you, then experiment with
liquid stripper vs a heavy bodied stripper. which one i would use
depends on the thickness of the finish.
and if you are going to strip all the walls, determine the square footage
and maybe buy your stripper in 5 gallon containers or larger.

if there is no actual finish on the walls, just sand them
to 220 then tack and white wash with an oil based product.
no top coat.

or
if there is no finish on the walls and they are just to dark for you
even after testing with a white wash, you might
try to bleach the walls. this is very messy.

stripping and bleaching requires ventalation and an approved resperator.
not a cheap white mask, one with cartridges that filter the fumes.
about $40
and box fans to aid the circulation. be aware of which way the
wind is flowing so as not to fight the wind.
 
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Old 03-23-06, 09:20 PM
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First bit of advice: DON"T DO IT!!!! (worst project I've ever undertaken, stripping wainscotting--it took about 6 months of Sundays--I learned all about spontaneous combustion when I hit an electrical outlet with mineral spirit soaked steel wool, which ignited and I dropped onto the PAPER drop cloth--long story short, thank god for a nearby fire extinguisher)

Second bit of advice: If you don't heed 1, above, use Peel Away stripper. Thick paste, with a barrier layer to apply while the stripper works. When you remove the paper, you can strip the remaining gunk onto the barrier paper. Low odor, environmentally friendly and works like a charm.

Third bit of advice: consider sanding it a bit, and attempting the white wash w/o stripping to bare wood. If you remove any topcoat (assuming there is one) you should be able to do your wash over any stain, and adjust the color to accomadate the stain. Word of advice, seal with water based poly or it will yellow badly.
 
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Old 03-27-06, 04:31 AM
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stripping wood panels part2

Sorry but my computer got messed up! Thanks so much. I donít know much about wood but the contractor working on the house told me is cypress. Yes in some areas you can see the grayish color of cypress but it was treated with a varnish I think to darken it. ALL interior walls have the same paneling (6Ē, tong and grove). All I want is to be able to lighten up the space but being able to see some of the wood grain. We demolished the kitchen area so I have some pieces of wood to practice on. I did the sanding first with 100 grit and striped another part with a spray stripper I bought from Home Depot and applied 50/50 diluted oil based paint on both sides. The sanded area doesnít show the wood grain at all. The stripped area looks very nice; it shows the grain as I want but the scale of job scares me. If I decide to paint it over with regular paint what steps should I take? Wash, prime with Kiltz and paint? Iím new to this site and I donít know how to post pictures. It would be esear for you to understand. Thanks again.
( the floor is terrazzo, an other nightmare!!!)
 

Last edited by ambasa01; 03-27-06 at 05:01 AM.
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Old 03-27-06, 05:25 AM
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No need to apologize about a messed up computer. My old computer w/win95 stayed messed up all the time, now I got new with xp and I probably mess up the computer more than the other way around.

You can paint the wood by using oil base kilz [or similiar] primer, you can then top coat with your choice of paint. IMO it would be a shame to cover up the wood. I don't know how dark it is or how light you wish to make it but a fresh coat of poly/varnish will allow the wood to reflect more light making it appear lighter - don't know if it would be enough for you or not but figured I'd mention it.

I'm familiar with the terrazzo floors, they may be cold and hard but they last forever.
 
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Old 03-28-06, 03:31 AM
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stripping wood panels

Thanks so much! Finally somebody feels with me. I agree: it would be a shame to cover the wood. Definitely will try the fresh poly/varnish see how it looks.
Best regards!
 
 

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