Painted Wood Paneling


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Old 04-03-06, 04:48 PM
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Painted Wood Paneling

I just discovered that my tenant in my English Basement is in the process of moving out and sometime in the last several months painted over most of the wood paneling ... without my permission. Is there anything I can do to restore the paneling? And at low cost? (Note that this is the popular 70s version of woodpaneling ... comes in sections like sheetrock ... not the custom type.) If it's not possible or practical to restore, how best to paint at the point in time ... with a coat of paint already on them? (I can be sure he didn't bother to sand first ... ) Thanks!
 

Last edited by SALONIAL; 04-03-06 at 04:50 PM. Reason: error correction
  #2  
Old 04-03-06, 05:08 PM
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I doubt there is an economical way to strip the paint off the paneling. The big thing is to determine how well the paint is bonded to the paneling.

It is hard to straighten up a poor paint job on paneling. What is stuck now may not be a month or so from now. About the only thing you can do is sand and paint with latex enamel [oil will work too]

The correct way to paint paneling is to sand, clean, prime with a solvent based primer and then finish with your paint of choice. Since enamel wears and cleans better it is what I recomend.

Wish you luck both with the paneling and your next tennant.
 
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Old 04-03-06, 05:51 PM
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That's what I was afraid of ...

Thanks for the reply.
 
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Old 04-04-06, 01:42 PM
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why not try a heat gun to peel the paint off?

maybe try a hair dryer set on high first to see
if it will work before buying a heat gun, if at all.
 
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Old 04-08-06, 09:09 PM
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thanks, I'll give that a try.
 
  #6  
Old 04-22-06, 01:28 AM
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don't sand cheap paneling

Hi, I found a quite easy way to "update" the 70's fake wood paneling in an investment property I purchased...I figured this one out cuz I had to live in it while fixing her up, and it was that dark paneling that just makes a room feel like you are in someone's basement gameroom (sorry)...
Anyway--buy some BIN Primer by Zinsser, I used the one with the red label--it is NOT LATEX, but if you can open the windows, you will see that this stuff is worth it's weight in gold!!!---it truly will cover and or seal just about ANYTHING---INCLUDING STRONG PET URINE SMELL--they use this stuff to seal in the residual odor and stains after fire damage. You can also use the latex it has the blue label, it will work just as well for priming paneling, I have used both for paneling, but the red label seals in odors. A 1 gallon bucket of it costs about $20, and it goes a long way, and dries very fast. You will only need one good coat over most anything. You can use any type of paint over top of it, regardless of which type of Zinsser primer you choose. I cannot say enough for this product. I have used other primers/sealers--NOTHING comes close. Especially to the red label primer/sealer. It works miracles in damp areas, and for priming kitchen cabinets. I did not sand my kitchen cabinets, I just degreased them, used the zinsser sealer, and a good quality latex kitchen paint, and walah!!! "new" kitchen cabinets, on a budget... .
Also, IMO, I like the look of painted paneling, if done in a white or very light shade, it will have a very "antiquey" feel, the texture of the lines in the paneling add some mild shadowy effect. And the room will be much brighter. Sorry to be so "down" on paneling, but my house was covered with it in every room (also dropped ceings and flourescent lights...ugh--they were immediately ripped down!), it made my large rooms feel clausterphobic, and my small rooms feel like closets. The apartment you have is probably beautiful, but now that the paneling is lighter, it may give off the "illusion" that it is not a basement apartment, and also make it look brighter and more inviting...meaning it'll be easier to rent, because it will feel happier to live in the basement apt. if it does not feel like a bsmt apt...go with it...you may well find you quite like it...or that you can raise the rent!!!---So, don't sand it, that wastes your time and energy...this is not real wood paneling, so it is like sanding pressed cardboard...just prime it, and paint away...you can use the primer on the moulding too if you want to lighten that up. Hope this helps and saves you some time!!!~~~Catia
 
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Old 04-22-06, 07:40 AM
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Just so there is no confusion - no primer or paint can make the first coat of paint bond to the surface. It doesn't matter how good paint is bonded to the paint already applied if the original paint doesn't have good adhesion.
 
 

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