dumb question lint ontop of paint job...


  #1  
Old 05-18-06, 04:38 AM
S
syd
syd is offline
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 30
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Question dumb question lint ontop of paint job...

using oil paint on table, black, i guess there is no way to avoid the lint that dries ontop of the paint????

first time oil painter....anyway to minimize brush strokes? paint says don't thin, its oil enamel?
thanks
 
  #2  
Old 05-18-06, 11:03 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,734
Received 860 Upvotes on 752 Posts
Even though it might say no thinning necesarry sometimes it is. Before thinning make sure the paint is throughly stirred and then thinn sparingly only if needed.

The cleaner the surface and surrounding conditions are the less the likelyhood of contaminents drying on the surface. Usually minor lint, etc can be buffed off once the paint is good and dry. Use a soft rag but the paint has to be good and dry. I'm repeating myself because if the paint hasn't cured you can mar the finish.
 
  #3  
Old 05-18-06, 11:36 AM
Annette's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Midwest
Posts: 4,017
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
i thought with oil paint, the brush strokes will level out as the paint dries, won't they?
 
  #4  
Old 05-18-06, 11:41 AM
S
syd
syd is offline
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 30
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Question marksr??? last question i swear!

thanks again.
my project is almost done i have one final question if you could answer for me.

I did my second coat with the grain like you said, but as i started the second coat i messed up and did about 6 inches of width the wrong way i caught it about 2 minutes later and started going the other way, but i think i see the wrong pattern as it drying can i do?
when it dries can i just sand that 6inch by 12 inch section lightly and repaint it, will it blend with the rest of the table?
 
  #5  
Old 05-18-06, 11:46 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Great Barrington MA
Posts: 496
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
A good way to minimize brush strokes is to simply use a good brush. There are brushes specifically designed for oil paints. Get a good brand like Purdy or the B Moore brushes aren't bad. Take care of them and they will last a long time. Remember you will need thinner, mineral spirits or the like to clean your brushes and anything else you don't want paint on. Oil paints are very messy and clean up is much harder then with latex. For that reason alone I tend to avoid it. However it is excellent paint otherwise.
 
  #6  
Old 05-18-06, 11:50 AM
S
syd
syd is offline
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 30
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Question

i hit enter too fast, sorry.
maybe i just stink at painting this is my first and probably last oil paint job, that maybe i should have done both coats in the same direction, i did what I was told to do the first coat against the grain and the second coat with the grain, but i swear i can see both coats going both ways as it dries. i don't think it it looks good. i even sanded in between.

should i try to sand just the chair seats and table top after the 2nd coat dries and try to put on a 3rd coat?
 
  #7  
Old 05-18-06, 06:16 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,734
Received 860 Upvotes on 752 Posts
Although it doesn't matter in which direction the paint is applied it should always be laid off with the direction of the grain.

While you don't have to repaint the entire piece you do need to repaint entire sections [ie:top] at a time as shiny enamel is very hard to touch up. If you have brush marks, they should be sanded out. Are you using a natural bristle brush? They are less likely to leave brush marks in oil base paint. If you have trouble with the paint dragging with the brush - thin the paint slightly.
 
  #8  
Old 05-18-06, 06:54 PM
S
syd
syd is offline
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 30
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Question

yes i'm using the white china bristle brush.
i just want this project over at this point. i wish i had just done both coats in the same pattern direction. Do you think if i do a 3rd coat going the same way as the second coat it will be enough to only see brush marks in that direction ?
i just don't want want to see the first coat's brush marks going in the perpendicular direction.
i don't mind seeing the brush marks just don't crisscrossing.

please let me know.
thanks.
 
  #9  
Old 05-19-06, 04:39 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,734
Received 860 Upvotes on 752 Posts
I'm not sure what you mean by pattern direction. When painting wood the paint should always be layed off [brushed] with the direction of the grain. This helps to minimize any brush marks. The only way to effectively get rid of brush marks in the wrong direction is to sand them off.
 
  #10  
Old 05-19-06, 05:07 AM
S
syd
syd is offline
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 30
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Question

marksr,
this is what you posted to me a couple days ago....

"You always want to finish brush with the direction of the wood grain. Brushing across grain and then laying it off with the grain is an old method to insure better coverage.
"

so this is what i did i did my first coat against the grain, then i did my 2nd coat with the grain. instead of seeing only brush marks going one way i can see both sets of brush marks from the first and second coat. i want to see brush marks only going with the grain. another words looking at the table i see lines going left and right and top and bottom. i did sand after the first coat didn't help. i'm asking if i put a 3rd coat on going the same direction as the second will it cover good enough that i only then see bursh marks going with the grain.
 
  #11  
Old 05-19-06, 09:33 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,734
Received 860 Upvotes on 752 Posts
Sorry, I guess I didn't do a good enough job of explaining.
What I meant was it is ok and sometimes preferable to brush the paint on across grain but then to lay it off [rebrush] with the grain - prior to it setting up or drying.

If it is sanded well enough a 3rd coat should help. It is a little hard to say from this end how much sanding will be needed to eliminate the unsightly cross grain brush marks. After you sand, wipe the surface down with a wet thinner rag. While it is wet with the thinner you should be able to tell if the brush marks will still be noticable. If they are you may need to sand some more.

Sorry for the confusion.
 
  #12  
Old 05-19-06, 11:46 AM
S
syd
syd is offline
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 30
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
thanks. my gut told me to just paint all coats in the same direction but since i've never worked with oil paints i didn't know if things were different. i'm going to play it on the safe side and sand all coats down to the original table and start over. its only the top surface. I'll take it as a learning experience.
 
  #13  
Old 05-19-06, 12:17 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,734
Received 860 Upvotes on 752 Posts
No need to sand it all off!
Once you have sanded halfway through the black you should have removed all the brush marks.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: