Painting Kitchen Cabinets


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Old 07-21-06, 07:11 AM
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Painting Kitchen Cabinets

Hi- We were given some used kitchen cabinets that I am planning on cleaning/priming and painting before we install them in our vacation home.

I did this years ago in our current home and wasn't pleased with the results- they chipped and the paint job didn't last well. I had painted them off-white using a recommended paint called Valspar or something like that (I had cleaned and primed them first so that wasn't the problem).

There are so many different ways that are recommended on the internet that I am totally confused. I would like to do this right this time. I would appreciate any help!

I will be cleaning using TSP, rinsing, filling holes with wood putty that doesn't shrink, sanding, then prime with B-I-N Zinsser (the cabinets are dark brown wood right now). Should I used the oil based version of Zinsser rather than latex for durability? Are these steps correct? I'd also like to somehow make them look weathered, but not necessarily antiqued.

What kind and brand of paint do you recommend? I read somewhere that a brand called Diamond-something paint has great durability. I also read that using a spray paint is better, or that latex is just as good as oil-based (I don't think that's true though) that you should not use a roller, that you should use a roller so you don't get brush marks, that you should seal with a poly and that you don't need to, etc. Aaaak! I am so confused!

I just want to do this so that the paint job lasts a long time. We are only planning on keeping this place for less than ten years and don't want to do this again before we sell.

Thanks!
 
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Old 07-21-06, 07:40 AM
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As you already know it is important to start with a good cleaning and sanding. The most likely reason for your previous paint failure was the use of the wrong type of primer. Whenever painting cabinets for the first time it is always best to use a solvent based primer. BIN is one such primer.

While latex paints are better than they used to be and oil base not as good as it used to be I would still recomend an oil base finish. The only exception would be the new waterborne enamels. I can heartily recomend both SWP and Ben Moore paints. Big box store paints are usualy sub par. Sealing with poly usually isn't necessarry.

How to apply the paint really depends on the skills and tools available. Spraying gives the best finish but often isn't an option for diyers. Brushing gives a better finish than rolling unless you have poor brushing skills, then an evenly rolled surface may look better.

hope this helps
 
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Old 07-22-06, 06:57 AM
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The Ideal Cabinet Repaint

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Old 07-22-06, 02:20 PM
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Originally Posted by mumsyof2
Hi- We were given some used kitchen cabinets that I am planning on cleaning/priming and painting before we install them in our vacation home.

I did this years ago in our current home and wasn't pleased with the results- they chipped and the paint job didn't last well. I had painted them off-white using a recommended paint called Valspar or something like that (I had cleaned and primed them first so that wasn't the problem).

There are so many different ways that are recommended on the internet that I am totally confused. I would like to do this right this time. I would appreciate any help!

I will be cleaning using TSP, rinsing, filling holes with wood putty that doesn't shrink, sanding, then prime with B-I-N Zinsser (the cabinets are dark brown wood right now). Should I used the oil based version of Zinsser rather than latex for durability? Are these steps correct? I'd also like to somehow make them look weathered, but not necessarily antiqued.

What kind and brand of paint do you recommend? I read somewhere that a brand called Diamond-something paint has great durability. I also read that using a spray paint is better, or that latex is just as good as oil-based (I don't think that's true though) that you should not use a roller, that you should use a roller so you don't get brush marks, that you should seal with a poly and that you don't need to, etc. Aaaak! I am so confused!

I just want to do this so that the paint job lasts a long time. We are only planning on keeping this place for less than ten years and don't want to do this again before we sell.

Thanks!
Oil is more durable, but has zero elastic qualities. There is a greater chance of cracking and chipping occuring at joins in the wood if you use oil. Latex paint has come along way, and most finishes offer similar durability as oil. Another advantage to oil is it's thicker and takes longer to dry! This is an advantage when doing cabinets besause it reduces brush or roller marks. If I used oil on cabinets, I would brush it with a high quality natural bristle brush, use a paint conditioner that extends the drying time even further to even out brush marks, and sand in between coats. However, I would paint the finish coats with latex. I would use the following products and the following steps, and I'll tell you why:
  1. Clean with TSP and rinse, because there is a lot of grease on the cabinets, even though you may not see it! Fill any holes like you said, and go a step further...if the cabinets are oak, then use filler to fill in the large grain over the whole cabinet so the final finish end up looking smooth.
  2. Lightly sand all cabinets
  3. Prime - I would use BIN because it's a shellac-based stain blocking primer and there's a chance that the old stain on the cabinets might blead through. Coverage is not important when it comes to primers, because there is not much pigment in them (more binders). Brush the primer on because primer shouldn't be thinned at all, and then sand to smooth brush marks. You can spray primer, but it needs to be an airless sprayer with a pretty large tip size.
  4. Paint your finish coat - two light coats of Flat 100% acrylic latex enamel. Flat so that your final finsh coat will stick (Last step). I would also rent a HVLP sprayer to do the doors, so you get a nice smooth, even, clean look.
  5. Weather or distress your finish coat - you can use couple different techniques, but the ones I see most often are little holes in a random but concentrated pattern. This simulates the tiny holes from some type of insect or larva make in wood. I also see a light sanding of random edges or corners to reveal underlying wood.
  6. After you distress it the way you like it, spray or brush two light coats of clear water-based poly. You don't need to spray because water-based poly is very thin, evens out real nice prior to drying. The finish(sheen) you use is up to you, but if your going for the distressed look use a satin finish. The poly is important because this will make it more durable than oil-based paint. Most floors are finished with poly because once cured, it is extremely durable, and resistant to almost all chemicals, water, dirt, and heat. If you ever need to restore this finish, you just lighly sand with synthetic steel wool, and apply another coat or touch-up.
 

Last edited by DIYaddict; 07-22-06 at 04:04 PM. Reason: Removed web site posted in signature
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Old 07-22-06, 05:23 PM
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I'd recommend NOT using TSP as a cleaner before using BIN
I'm sure Zinsser says not to also, it's not a real good mix
....I'll check my TSBs but I've done it and it's not a real good idea

I'd also not recommend painting a flat then using a water poly to shine it up
But as most enamels don't even come flat I guess that point is moot
 
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Old 07-23-06, 03:52 PM
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Painting Cabinets

Wow, lots of information. I am still confused. I think what I will do is this..... clean with TSP, rinse well. (did that) Sand well with 180. (did that) One layer of BIN Zinsser. (did that) I will lightly sand. I will get a satin oil based BM paint. I will hope for the best.
 
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Old 07-23-06, 06:08 PM
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I'm glad it's worked out so far
I'd just like to repeat that it's not a good idea to clean with TSP before using BIN
It can make a gooey mess if the TSP is not fully rinsed, and TSP does hang in there a bit, a simple rinse won't get it all
I checked the Tech Data from Zinsser, the makers of BIN, and they say Do Not Clean With TSP before using BIN
I'd suggest an ammonia/water solution

Personally I like working with Ben Moore's Oil-Based Satin Impervo
I'm finishing a table with it right now (over BIN...it was a dark stained table)
 
 

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