Painting Cabinets - Time, etc?

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-02-06, 10:23 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Painting Cabinets - Time, etc?

Greetings,

Dh will be gone for one week. During that time I plan to paint and faux glaze our kitchen cabinets to have an antique look. I do all the painting in the house and realize prep can make or break any paint job. I've researched latex vs enamel and am 90% sure I will go with enamel. I'm already a proponet for using the best paint and brushes you can afford and usually prefer SW, so no problem there.

As soon as dh's wheels leave the driveway, I will

remove doors, drawers and hardware
clean with tsp or ammonia & water
sand
tack cloth
prime
sand if necessary and tack cloth
top coat
sand and tack cloth
top coat
sand and tack cloth
glaze finish to give the cabinets an antiqued look

My questions are:

1) Since I plan on using enamel, can I use the glaze I normally use for the faux finish or should I go with an oil based something or other? Hmmm, does such a thing even exist? Usually when I am faux painting I use latex as the base coat.

2) Should I put a non-yellowing clear coat over the glaze? Don't want my hard work washed away!

3) Is it possible to use all latex products and then on the very last coat use a clear coat for floors to create a hard finish or am I asking for trouble? (I have faux painted a linoleum floor using latex products and then topcoated with a clear coat for floors. I've read through the forum and realize that most of you don't recommend painting linoleum, but the floor is four years old and still looks great. I can only credit it to doing the prep work and that I didn't know I couldn't try that four years ago. grin)

4) With drying time etc, is this even realistic to do in one week? (18 doors and 7 drawers) Dh is not enamored with the kitchen being torn apart, hence the reason I was going to do it while he was gone.

Thanks for your advice!

Robin
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-02-06, 11:10 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Posts: 295
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Do you plan on eating or sleeping? It may be doable, but probably not.

First, I found when cleaning my cabinets that mineral spirits cut the grease better than TSP or amonia.

Second, I am guessing you plan on using alkalyd enamel. Have you glazed over enamel before--its tough as the glaze slides off. You might consider using aqua bond (a latex base coat for faux finishes) then you can skip the primer coat (aqua bond acts as a primer--really, its great--and the base coat. Because its latex, it dries quickly and since it sounds like you are applying by brush, aqua bond has the added benefit of being highly sandable (in other words, you can sand out any brush marks). If you use aqua bond, you can also use aqua glaze or aqua cream, which will give you lots more open time than many other manufactured glazes. Additionally, aqua products makes some excellent top coats, many of which are compatible with alkalyd if you go that route, all are non-yellowing. The C-500 is amazing, as is the aquathane--but both are "hot finishes" so a barrier layer of aqua gaurd is recommended. Most of the aqua products will allow you to do a second coat w/in a few hours or less.

I would definetely recommend top coating, as a glaze finish will never be a tough as paint because it is by its nature a "broken" finish. Be sure to use a non-yellowing, i.e. waterbased, poly, whatever you do (I speak from experience, first kitchen I did looked horrible a year later from the oil based varnish).

Can you do this in one week? Normal people couldn't--I had the same situation, only my husband and children were out for 5 days. I worked day and night, paid someone to remove the doors, and to replace the door and drawer hardware. I was finished in two weeks--and my husband wasn't happy until it was done.

The prep is the biggest and most time consuming part of this job. You could probably speed things along a bit if you could spray your doors, but that would require additional prep masking the area where you were going to spray.

Be sure to let us know whether you were succesful!
 
  #3  
Old 08-02-06, 12:16 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi Kimeyers! LOL! I LOVE are person with a sense of humor! I do plan on eating and sleeping, maybe a little. (grin)

What a wealth of information you are! These aqua products sound intriguing. I immediately googled to read more about them. It seems that some SW stores, but maybe not all, carry them which may be why I've never heard of the line before.

Let me see if I understand what you are proposing.

Clean doors etc
Use aquabond (and this will cover a dark stain? Would two coats be suggested?)
Sand if I don't care for the brush marks (I'll only be bothered if it levels as badly as B**R paint.)
Aquaglaze or aquacream with my tint to create my faux finish
aquaguard (not familiar with the term "hot finish" but after reading about the aquaguard it seems like it would go in between the glaze and the clear coat)
aquathane

What exactly is the difference between aquaguard and aquathane? The first is a "varnish" but goes inbetween coats. The second is a co-polymer urethane that dries to a hard finish. It seems that there is a subtle difference. Is the aquaguard more of a polishing thing since you rub it and perhaps not as hard as the aquathane?

And finally, will using these products prevent the gummy feeling and look that I see on most painted cabinets which was my main reason for planning on using enamel in the first place?

The Aqua products certainly seem to reduce the amount of work and I am definitely re-considering my plan of attack on this kitchen!

Thanks,
Robin
 
  #4  
Old 08-02-06, 12:56 PM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Posts: 295
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Don't forget to sand before painting--you need to give it some tooth.

If the products aren't available locally, buy them online--delivery is very quick.

Depending on how dark the stain, you may need a third coat, but probably not. It levels fairly well, but if you tip off you can skip the final sand before glazing.

Aqua cream is tinted with aqua color or other acrylic colorants, and is more transparent. For antiqueing I use glaze, which you can tint with any high-quality paint (you can use aqua colors, but it will dry very slow).

The aqua gaurd is a sufficient top coat for many applications, however, when doing cabinets a stronger top coat is recommended. I used aquathane on mine, and despite "captain destruction" (my nickname for my 3-year old) they don't have a chip on them after 18 months--and I painted the dishwasher and microwave, too). The aqua guard will act as a top coat (brushed or sprayed on), but also will provide a barrier between the aquathane which could reactivate your glaze (I've used it straight on top of aqua cream, but not glaze, with no ill effects, but the mfg discourages it).

If you googled aqua products, you probably found several sites which sell the entire line. They dry very hard, and I haven't experienced any of the gummy problems--even on bookshelves. Once you try them (or any other pro line of glazes) you will never look back.

However, if you go with the alkalyd--(which will dry much slower) you can use an oil based glaze. Both BM and SW carry a commercial glaze in oil, although I don't really like either, but that's just me.

And believe it or not, I have no financial interest in aqua products, I'm just a big fan. I've done lots of faux painting, and three kitchens. Always used oils until this time. This kitchen looks better, no yellowing and has not chipped or failed in any way. As a result, I've antiqued the wainscotting in the diningroom and the woodwork in the foyer and am looking for my next project and waiting for my husband to go out of town
 
  #5  
Old 08-02-06, 03:23 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi Kimeyers!

Found a SW store that carries the Aqua line so I took little self out there and got some literature. It looks great! Wish my local store carried it. But at the aqua prices, I'm sure there aren't that many out here who would see the value in buying a good product. Why is that anyway? Well, I think I'll take the plunge and try it. What have got to lose except a few hundred bucks and some time. At $50 a gallon I'm tempted to prime with something cheaper, but and then use the aqua bond; however I usually use Zinser 123 which isn't ALL that much cheaper.

Wow! Holds up to a 3 year old. Now that IS a testimony. I'll let you know if it holds up to a clutzy 17 boy! (big grin)

Thanks for all the tips! Now I can't wait for dh to go out of town. Have to wait til the end of September. Wonder if can rush him? lol

Robin
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: