refinishing knotty pine


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Old 09-28-06, 06:51 PM
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Angry refinishing knotty pine

I recently gutted out an old farm house that had tounge and grove knotty pine walls and ceilings and I have been refinishing it by stripping, bleaching and restaining. even after all this I still am still having trouble were there was things hanging on the walls. No matter what I do the spots still remain lighter when I restain them. Any suggestion PLEASE HELP
 
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Old 09-29-06, 05:46 AM
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Welcome to the forums

Did you do any sanding prior to staining?
 
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Old 09-29-06, 05:55 AM
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yes i stripped with a chem stripper bleached then sanded with 60 grit then 150 grit it didnt look bad until I stained it then you could really see it again. On some of the boards that the ceiling beams were on it dont look bad because those spots actually got little darker and it is 100+ year old wood and I dont expect it to look like new wood but the ones I am having the problem with was were a spice rack and cutting board was hanging on the wall.
 
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Old 09-29-06, 06:08 AM
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UV rays [even inside] affect how wood ages. Because those areas where covered they didn't age the same. Sanding it all down to fresh wood usually helps.

You might try applying some stain and sanding it in while still wet. Some times you can add a little color to the varnish and 'paint' the affected area to make it blend. This can be difficult for a pro to do so I'm leary of recomending it.

Sorry i can't be of more help

mark
 
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Old 09-29-06, 06:15 AM
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Marksr, could it be that in addition to UV, that possibly some sort of "fuming" has taken place over time? Regardless, I would think that if one sanded a LOT (perhaps more sanding than what has already been done), you would get down to unaffected wood. A belt sander would be the fastest.
 
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Old 09-29-06, 06:15 AM
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thank you at this piont any insite is better than none, and anything is worth a try.
 
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Old 09-29-06, 06:19 AM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper
Marksr, could it be that in addition to UV, that possibly some sort of "fuming" has taken place over time?
YES

As far as I know the fix would be the same
 
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Old 09-29-06, 06:21 AM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper
A belt sander would be the fastest

I agree BUT unless extreme care is used I would be afraid of cutting too deep and making a few boards look different than the rest.
 
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Old 09-29-06, 06:22 AM
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thank you xsleeper that is pretty much the way I started to go with it because I wasn't sure what else to do however it has made a slight difference but nothing major. I guess I will just have to keep sanding I may try to sand some of a little stain into the wood like marksr had suggested. I mean whats the worse that could happen if it dont go well I can just restrip it again.
 
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Old 10-01-06, 09:33 PM
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Thumbs up

Originally Posted by marksr
UV rays [even inside] affect how wood ages. Because those areas where covered they didn't age the same. Sanding it all down to fresh wood usually helps.

You might try applying some stain and sanding it in while still wet. Some times you can add a little color to the varnish and 'paint' the affected area to make it blend. This can be difficult for a pro to do so I'm leary of recomending it.

Sorry i can't be of more help

mark
marksr just wanted to say thank you for the input and to tell you that I took some darker stain than what I was using on the wood and mixed it then kind of streaked it on with a damp cloth then lite sanded while it was still wet and IT ACTUALLY WORKED. the spot is still a little bit different but it no longer has the look of a spice rack and blends really nice with the rest of the board. Again THANK YOU for taking the time to help.
 
 

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