Painting laminate cabinets - drilling holes for H/W?


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Old 01-31-07, 08:12 AM
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Painting laminate cabinets - drilling holes for H/W?

We are going to paint our 80's beige and wood grain laminte contracter special cabinites and I'm a bit concerned about drillign the holes for new handles and pulls - shoudl I be?

I'm concered that after painting I may chip the paint while drilling the wholes - am I being parinoid?

Also, one of my neighbors works for a Kitchen remodel store and offered to get me my materials at her cost (Yeee-haa!) and suggested I use Bullseye 1,2,3 primer (thats what she used on the same cabinets) is this a "shellac based primer"?
 
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Old 01-31-07, 08:30 AM
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Zinnsers makes many fine primers. Bullseye is latex, IMO, BIN [pigmented shellac] would be a better choice of primer for your cabinets.

Once the paint is cured and care along with sharp bit there shouldn't be a problem drilling holes for the hardware. Any reason not to drill them first?
 
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Old 01-31-07, 09:30 AM
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I thought of drilling the holes first but thought that might be worse since paitn and priner is bound to get int he hole and when picking it out, re drilling a hole, etc it would be even mroe apt to chip or peel...

Not sure though, never done thsi before so if anyone has any experiance or tips on the best way to do this I would grealty appreciate it...


I though about putting dowels or somehting in the holes and then paint - but when I pull them out would the paint peel?
 
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Old 01-31-07, 01:58 PM
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I'd drill them first
Any paint that gets in the hole can be carefully carved out
IMO much easier/safer than drilling a new finish
 
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Old 01-31-07, 07:37 PM
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put tape over the spot where you are drilling, just to avoid chipping off the laminate. I'd drill before, if you already have your hardware. Bin is a good choice--you need a primer that will adhere to difficult surfaces. Murralo makes a good one too.
 
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Old 02-01-07, 04:32 AM
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Hello,

For drilling holes for hardware, I make a jig out of a scrap piece of pegboard then clamp it in place using a scrap of wood on the other side to prevent tear out (splintering/chipping when the drill bit exits).
I use the Irwin clamps form Lowes.

I use a *Vix bit to start the hole, then switch to another drill with the proper sized bit, to complete the hole.
(*a Vix bit is a special drill bit for drilling holes for hinges. Home Depot carries one made by Ryobi. It runs around $5.00)

It's simple, cheap and highly repeatable. Simply marking the hole in the pegboard you use allows you to position all of the holes in the exact locations on all of the doors. The Vix bit prevents the drill bit from "walking" on the surface.

It also doesn't matter that much (with this setup) if you drill before or after finishing. The pegboard and the wood backer protect the surface.

If you don't have any scraps of pegboard, you can fashion a jig out of a piece of 1/2" or 1/4" plywood and drill a hole in it slightly larger than the hole required for the mounting screw. The Vix bit will center itself in that hole and allow you to make a shallow start. Then simply finish drilling through with the proper sized bit.

I'd love to take credit for this idea, but I "stole" it from someone else.
I used to use a piece of cardboard as a jig to mark the location of the holes, then drill the holes using a drill press. It worked extremely well, but was time consuming - plus not everyone has a drill press - the doors all had to be taken down and clamped to the drill press table.

Zinsser's B-I-N pigmented shellac or their Bulleseye 1-2-3 will work as a primer. I've used both at one time or another and they both hold up equally well. I generally lean towards the B-I-N if it's a location with plenty of air circulation, simply because I like the way it sands out a little better. The 1-2-3, being water reduced, has no solvent fumes.

kimeyers suggestion of masking tape is the traditional way of drilling mounting holes. While it works, there can still be some "walking" of the drill bit. I've used that method (and still do sometimes) if I only have one or two pieces of hardware to mount.
More than 1 or 2, and I use the jig/Vix bit.
 
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Old 02-01-07, 05:22 AM
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I have heard I should get a "resperator" to use the B-I-N - can i just got one of those doctors mask lookign things or do I have to get a real proffesional grade resporator?
 
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Old 02-01-07, 06:20 AM
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A dust mask doesn't adequaetly filter paint fumes and isn't rated for painting but for a 1 time use, it should be ok.
 
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Old 02-01-07, 06:51 AM
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Thanks, I should have noted I will have a window less then 5 feet from me that will be open and I will open one on the other side of the house and try to get a cross breeze going as well...
 
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Old 02-01-07, 07:06 AM
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You might want to place a fan at one of the windows exhausting the paint fumes.
 
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Old 02-01-07, 07:22 AM
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The big box stores have reasonably priced respirators (around $20) with filters--don't risk your brain cells over $20--even one time. You could probably sell the respirator on Craigslist for 1/2 what you paid, if money is an issue. Also, use the fan for cross ventilation. Another option with lower VOC is PrimEtch by aqua products, which works well for plastic veneers. No respirator required, but this product works best under the aqua line of paints, ie aqua bond.
 
 

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