Solution for sticky kitchen lacquer


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Old 02-04-07, 09:11 AM
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Solution for sticky kitchen lacquer

I've got a 12 year old oak kitchen with a clear lacquer finish over a medium stain. The cabinets are in good condition with one exception. Some of the doors closest to the range top are sticky around the handles. It's my understanding? this is a common issue with lacquer and comes from body oils interacting with the lacquer.

I'm trying to correct this without a complete refinish. Is there anything I can do to stabilize, clean, correct, or otherwise deal with the problem without stripping and refinisning the effected areas?

I have some wood finishing experience and have never observed a really good spot stripping treatment on clear finishes so I'm concerned about going down this path.

Help anyone...

Thanks... Alan
 
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Old 02-05-07, 04:27 AM
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this is NOT common with a good lacquer. A catalyzed lacquer is more durable and chemical resistant then a varnish or a poly.
 
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Old 02-05-07, 09:08 AM
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Grease, grit, and grime will create this problem of stickiness. A good cleaning with mineral spirits and clean cloths should remove all the problematic accumulation. Wipe the surface with clean cloths dampened with mineral spirits until the cloths come away clean. Let this dry. Mineral spirits will dry without leaving any residue or damaging the finish or lack thereof. Once this is complete you will be able to evaluate the condition of the finish.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 02-07-07, 05:09 PM
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Originally Posted by chfite View Post
Grease, grit, and grime will create this problem of stickiness. A good cleaning with mineral spirits and clean cloths should remove all the problematic accumulation. Wipe the surface with clean cloths dampened with mineral spirits until the cloths come away clean. Let this dry. Mineral spirits will dry without leaving any residue or damaging the finish or lack thereof. Once this is complete you will be able to evaluate the condition of the finish.

Hope this helps.

Hi Chris,

I've actually done exactly what you suggested with mineral spirits and other solvents. The stickyness was reduced but it is still there. I'm convinced it's the lacquer breaking down or something. I'm just trying to find a solution other than a total strip to get this corrected.

I do appreciate your response.

Thanks, Alan
 
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Old 02-07-07, 05:39 PM
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To take Chris's suggestion one step further, instead of using a cloth (if you've already tried that), you might try rubbing lightly with a lacquer pad, or possibly very lightly rubbing with extra fine steel wool.

I'd actually suggest trying this with a detergent (such as TSP) first before attempting it with more solvent.
 
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Old 02-08-07, 06:53 AM
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This is a stepwise process to lead up to the inevitable stripping. Unfortunately, grease, grit, grime, and human skin oils will accumulate and break down some finishes over time.

Even if it turns out that the remaining finish is thin when you finally get it clean, if will be easier to renew the finish than it will be to strip and refinish.
 
 

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