How Will My Kitchen Cabinets Look Like This?


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Old 02-14-07, 08:03 PM
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How Will My Kitchen Cabinets Look Like This?

We can't afford to replace our kitchen cabinets, so we are thinking of painting them. We want to lighten our kitchen, and currently the cabinets are dark brown. Almost simultaneously my husband and I came up with the idea of leaving the cabinets dark brown and painting just the doors a cream color or off-white. We would change the hinges drawer pulls, and knobs to black.

How do you guys think that would look?

Thanks for your help!

Would you also give me your opinion on painting the upper cabinets cream colored, and leaving the bottom cabinets wood? We would use the same black hinges, knobs, and drawer pulls on both. Thanks!
 
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Old 02-14-07, 09:28 PM
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2 Colour Scheme sounds goods

I think light on top and dark on bottom sounds good. However, I would suggest rather than a solid cream that you try a wash or stain technique. The idea being to create a light finish that retains the wood grain. This would better compliment the wood finish of the existing.
 
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Old 02-14-07, 10:10 PM
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Do you mean like using a glaze that I would wipe off? How could I do a wash technique over stained cabinets? Do you have a product you recommend? I don't think I can do stain over stain and go lighter on this project.

Would it look good also to paint the top a solid cream and then do a brown glaze over it to give it an antiqued look?
 
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Old 02-15-07, 03:52 PM
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This is a can-o-worms with me, but I'll keep it short.
We recently went through a similar situation. We needed to update the kitchen (of 30 years), but didn't have the money to remodel. First are the options, in order of cost/time:
1) paint (cheap, minimal time)
2) strip and refinish (cheap, time intensive)
3) reface (less expensive than total replacement, more expensive than 1&2
4) replace (more expensive, even building completely myself
What I tried:
First I tried sandblasting to restain and finish, took way too much time. Next I tried stripping, didn't remove all of the finish so sanding was going to take way too much time. I finally ended up painting the cabinets with a brush and can of paint and sprayed to doors w/ a "stainless steel" spray paint. Turned out pretty cool. I did this with the intention of a "quick fix", in a year or so we'll do the remodel.
What I would advise:
Do the cheap, minimal time method that you can live with, then replace when you have the money.
Hope this helps.
JC
 
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Old 02-15-07, 03:59 PM
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Almost forgot, hardware.
I just spray painted mine. (if metal, soak in vinegar for apr 1hr (removes the topcoat), rinse, and dry thoroughly!, spray w/ primer, then 2 thin coats of spray paint color). Since we are going to replace in a year or so I didn't want to replace hardware, it's expensive. We'll put the money in it when we remodel.
JC
 
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Old 02-15-07, 04:15 PM
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Yes, I was thinking of antique type glazing

You proably don't want to have to strip everything. So sand to rough up, apply primer, paint, sand to expose grain and rub in a glaze that coordinates with the existing colour. Do a test piece first. You may want to finish with varathane or varnish.
 
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Old 02-15-07, 05:18 PM
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Thanks to you all for your suggestions! We got tired of dancing around this subject so my husband just went for it! With minimal time and effort he sanded one door down to the bare wood.

Could we restain maybe an oak or cherry color now that we are down to the bare wood? Someone told me we'd have to go lighter and could not go darker. Is that true?

The decorative scroll type pattern in the door couldn't be sanded. Do you think a Dremel (sp?) type tool would get this job done?

If, for some reason, every last bit of the stain is not sanded off, what would be the result when we stain another color?

Thanks to everyone!
 
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Old 02-16-07, 08:18 AM
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Since you're down to bare wood you can apply just about any finish you want. Keep in mind, if you aren't able to get all! of the old stain off your new stain will appear slightly darker. It sounds like you won't be able to with the carvings. In this case I would lean toward a darker stain (between oak or cherry, I'd go for the cherry). Most home improvement, hardware, and paint stores carry small sample packets of the stains. I'd get a couple shades of these and, if possible, try 'em out on an out of sight area that can be easily sanded to remove it. I would also recomend trying a glaze stain (a stain w/ a glazing compound in it) these apply in an even color and are especially good w/ wood that has stains, uneven color, etc.
A Dremel would work on the carvings, don't forget that the time it takes to do one, you have to multiply by the number of cabinet doors. As long as you get all of the old finish off you'll be fine. If you don't get all of the old stain off it'll appear darker when you apply the new stain, I'd call it character.
I'm not sure what the person with the advice that you have to go lighter had in mind. In fact its easier to go darker. They might have been thinking if you didn't remove the old stain the new stain would have to be very light. If it wasn't, your new color would be very! dark.
JC
 
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Old 02-16-07, 11:14 AM
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Talking Coordinating Cherry Stain with other stain in the room

I LOVE the thought of cherry stain! We are going to try it. I typed the wrong thing in my last post. It was a darker, not lighter stain the person said we would have to use.

We have crown molding in the kitchen, as well as chair rail in the kitchen that are the same color our cabinets are now. We don't want to have to sand everything in there, so can we mix stain colors in the same room? It will be dark brown crown molding (including the top of cabinets) and dark brown chair rail with cherry cabinets. How will that look?

What could we do to use cherry stain in other parts of the kitchen without having to strip all of the dark brown stain off?

I hope this makes sense.

Would it be better since we really have to leave some dark brown stain in the room to go with an oak stain instead of a cherry?

Thanks!
 
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Old 02-19-07, 07:38 AM
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Without seeing the room I can't really say how the different tones would look. The rule of thumb in designing is no more than 3 different tones of wood, I prefer no more than 2.
If your going to do the same stain on other pieces you just have to make sure the process is the same. ex. If you want to put in a new piece of trim you first have to match the color of the wood before you put on the cherry (probably a walnut or similar) then put on the cherry.
In my experience when mixing types of wood in a room you can only have one strong, bold. The others need to be neutral. In your case the cherry would be the strong color, so the other (oak) would look best blonde (natural). Otherwise, the room may look partially finished. **This is a design guideline, if the over-all look and feel of the house allow it, you can do it.
With stains the only way to know for sure is to try it. I might also suggest picking up a piece of oak, staining it to match your wood, then trying a bunch of stains and finishes in 3,4,5" sections.
Another tip, I usually mix my own stains, here's how:
At the paint store, pick any color of paint you want as long as you can get it in 1 quart, oil based. Mix 3 parts paint to 1 part paint thinner (aproximate). Apply as you would any other stain. This will stain the would the color of the paint, but, leave the grain coming through.
JC
 
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Old 02-19-07, 08:01 AM
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What a great stain making tip! We tried some Cherry stain over the weekend and it didn't look that much different than what we already have.

We had decided to paint the cabinets, but maybe using your "recipe" we could stain them the color we want.

We had decided to do the upper cabinets a cream color and the lower cabinets black. The two small cabinet doors above the stove we are going to do in a blue-green color and the two doors below the sink a red color. The green and red are coming from a border that's in the room.

If it's possible to color match oil-based paint, maybe we can get oil-based colors and make stain. I have a feeling that oil-based will wear better than latex.

One problem. My overzealous husband put Zinsser on some of the cabinet doors over the weekend in preparation for painting. Maybe he can sand it all off so that we can apply stain?

Thanks again for your help! I'll let you know how it comes out.
 
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Old 02-19-07, 10:33 AM
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Sounds nice, I like the black @ white contrast. Sounds like your on the road to a "new" kitchen. Absolutely, let us know how it turns out.
JC
 
 

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