when to stain new window trim?


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Old 02-17-07, 08:10 AM
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when to stain new window trim?

we put in new windows, now need to stain the trim. We are removing the trim, that the contractors lightly attached. Do we fill in the old holes & remove the nails, or reuse them? Or new nails new holes, & how do we fill & stain them after permanently attaching? thanks
 
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Old 02-17-07, 08:16 AM
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Welcome to the diy forums!

Whenever possible/feasable I prefer to stain and seal/poly the woodwork before it's installed. After staining, sealing and installing use colored putty [they sell little jars of colored putty wherever stain is sold] to fill the nail holes - it may take more than 1 color to make the putty blend/disappear. After you are done puttying sand lightly, dust and apply another coat of varnish/poly.

It usually takes 1 coat of stain [wipe off excess] and 3 coats of varnish/poly.
 
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Old 02-17-07, 04:37 PM
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If the nails were set, do not knock them back out, pull them thru the wood or they may crack and split the wood around the nail hole.
 
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Old 02-18-07, 05:02 AM
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I agree with what Marksr says. I just recently helped my son restain the trim around his interior doors and here's how we did it:
1. Removed trim from each door and labelled the back of the trim and concealed area of door with permanent marker to facilitate reattachment later.
2. Pulled old nails out from back of trim (not from front).
3. Wiped down all boards with paint thinner to get them good and clean.
4. Applied one coat of stain, and wiped off excess.
5. Filled in the old nail holes that needed filling in with wood putty. I bought several of those small Min-Wax plastic containers of wood putty and mixed them together until I was satisfied with the color.
6. Wiped off excess putty and smoothed with paper towels.
7. Applied polyurethane.
8. Reattached trim using air brad gun -- they don't split the wood. If I hadn't had this tool I would have pre-drilled the new nail holes to avoid splitting the trim. My gun doesn't have one of those non-marring heads, so I have to use care when shooting the brads.
9. Set the brads with nail set where deemed necessary. Some of the brad heads were so unnoticable that we left them alone.
10. Filled these holes with more putty. At this point we could have put some polyurethane over this putty, but we didn't think it was necessary.

PS: If your contractor left the nail heads protruding from the trim (i.e., not driven flush with the wood), then I'd probably reuse them. I'd pull them out before removing the trim using a 1/4" backer board between the trim and my hammer to leverage my hammer against to prevent marring the wood.
 
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Old 02-18-07, 07:15 AM
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Originally Posted by bigfred View Post
4. Applied one coat of stain, and wiped off excess.
5. Filled in the old nail holes that needed filling in with wood putty.
The correct procedure is to stain, then seal [poly/varnish] and then putty. While most of the time you can get by with applying putty to unsealed wood there is a chance that the unsealed wood will "suck" the oils out of the putty discoloring the surrounding wood.
 
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Old 02-18-07, 07:21 AM
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Marksr: Good point! After reading your post I think a better approach is to apply a coat of poly before the putty (thus sealing the nail holes), then applying subsequent coats of poly over the putty (thus better blending the puttied nail holes with the surrounding surface).
 
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Old 02-18-07, 07:24 AM
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>>The correct procedure is to stain, then seal [poly/varnish] and then putty.

In other words, the putty is applied after the first coat (the sealer coat) but additional coats are applied over the putty.

If the trim is prestained and finished, then installed, nail holes must be filled after the trim is installed, then a final coat of finish applied to the trim in the home, in order to cover up and preserve the nail putty, keeping it from attracting dirt, etc.
 
 

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