acheiving a chocolate color with stain


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Old 04-26-07, 07:54 PM
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acheiving a chocolate color with stain

Hi, I recently removed the finish from my bedrm furniture - it had a black laquer finish. It was custom made by a local company (sort of like gothic cabinets). not sure what type of wood it is, but it's plywood with some veneer (I would guess ash or birch). I wanted to stain it to match the chocolate color of West Elm furniture... I bought minwax jacobean stain.

Will this acheive that type of color?

should I apply more then 1 coat?

I was gonna apply tung oil as the topcoat - I wanted a satin smooth-to-the-touch finish.

Would love to hear your opinions and advice.

Thanks in advance for your ideas and thoughts on this

/Nick
 
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Old 04-27-07, 09:26 AM
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The only way to determine if the color you bought will give you the color you want is to try it - probably in some inconspicuous area.

Second coats will do very little to darken the color - the first coat seals the wood.

Tung oil is a very good finish, but doesn't lend itself easily to a 'satin smooth' finish unless you're willing to apply multiple (4 - 6) coats.

If you decide to use tung oil, look for a product that says it is IS 100% tung oil, not just 'made from' 100% pure tung oil. There is a difference in quality and price
 
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Old 04-27-07, 11:50 AM
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thanks George

I read in another forum somewhere, that mixing Minwax Jacobean + minwax ebony would result in a rich chocolate color. Any thoughts on this?

BTW, I already bought the minwax tung oil. I assume it's a mixture of tung oil + ingredients that make application easier (but evaporate once applied).

Do you think that would produce the desired results, after multiple applications?

I also saw a suggestion to apply the tung oil with 400 grit sandpaper - it supposedly help infuse the finish into the wood better and produces a very smooth finish..

interested in hearing your thought (or from others that have experience with this).

Thanks again

/Nick
 
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Old 04-28-07, 06:47 AM
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Never tried ro 400 paper in applying tung oil. You're liable to sand through the color, even with that fine a paper.

I use the 'rag on and rag off' method. Apply with a rag, let stand the suggested time (it's on the can) and then wipe off and let dry.

If the veneer/exterior plywood is ash , maple, or any other close grained wood a thorough sanding and dusting with a tack rag will gve you a good start to a smooth finish.

You'll still have to apply several coats, but it's a very 'doable' project.
 
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Old 04-30-07, 10:58 AM
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Results and observations

Thanks for your help!

Mixing the 2 stains, I was able to produce the "chocolate" color I was looking for. The proportions seem to depend upon the type of wood. Using a higher proportion of ebony worked well on the pine 1/4 round and the furniture. The new poplar moulding though turned out more black then chocolate. I'll try adding more jacobean to see if that works better.

In terms of application - I found that leaving the stain on (and not wiping it off) works best. In some cases, I had to apply 2 coats (once the 1st dried).

I conclude that for most cases, a mix of 1/2 jacobean and 1/2 ebony would work well.

I'll try a light sanding and then apply the tung oil.

Thanks again for your feedback.

/Nick
 
 

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