Need to create a solid finish for a mosaic countertop


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Old 02-04-08, 02:43 PM
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Need to create a solid finish for a mosaic countertop

My sister recently created a really neat looking mosaic on an island that I built for her kitchen. However she used broken tiles and plates to make this, so the top is uneven. Now that she has it all set and grouted does anyone know what would be best to make a clear smooth counter top finish? Can we coat it enough with polyurethane to achieve the thickness needed to get a flat final product? Any info would be very much appreciated. I could get pics if that might help anyone.
 
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Old 02-04-08, 02:58 PM
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I've never tried it with anything like you describe, but a pour-on epoxy polymer coating, like you see on bartops might work. Here's a couple:

http://www.blueridgeproducts.com/hi_shine.html

http://www.uscomposites.com/kk121.html

You can Google "pour on epoxy polymer bar top" and get others. Most craft stores will carry it.

Couple of tips:

1. The surface, including all the grout has to be THOROUGHLY sealed. Otherwise after you pour the epoxy it will bleed air bubbles into the epoxy.

2. Practice, practice, practice,before you do it for real. After you mix and pour the epoxy it will cover the surace and self-level with excess running off the sides. After a few minutes (check instructions) you have to get the air bubbles out that inevitably occur during the pour. This is done either by exhaling repeatedly over the surface (the CO2 in your breathe causes the bubbles to rise and burst) or you can pass the flame of a propane torch a couple of inches over the surface and the same thing will occur.
3. Once the surface has cured you can sand it to level high spots and pour additional coats.
4. While the epoxy is curing it is very prone to picking up dust, so it's best to set up a dust cover such as some chairs around the project that you can drape an old sheet over to prevent dust from settling.
 
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Old 02-04-08, 04:31 PM
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Another name for the epoxy that the tow guy is speaking is "decoupage".
Pay close attention to his suggestions. He's right on the money with what he's telling you.
Check with some craft stores or hobby shops in your area. If they don't stock it, they should be able to order it.

Good luck,
CD
 
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Old 02-05-08, 04:05 AM
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don't go to craft stores to get pour finish. you will pay through the nose, your local paint store should be able to get it for you. We sell it by the pallet to some furniture makers.

the key is to mix. and mix, and mix again. mix a batch in one container then pour that batch to another container and scrape the first one out. then mix again. you have to mix BY HAND for at least 1-3 minutes. then forget the breathing on it. use a torch, this gets your head away from the surface and works much better. I have heard from some customers, but not tried it yet, to use the yellow propane can. it gives off more CO2. I don't know how long it takes grout sealer to cure, but wait at least as long as the sealer directions say. and finally you do need to practice.
 
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Old 02-05-08, 04:22 AM
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Should have said the torch would be the preferred method. Breathing is okay for small projects, but you'd pass out trying to de-bubble something like you describe.

One last tip: make sure you mix enough so that when you pour you have sufficient quantity to cover and overflow the surface; better too much than too little.
 
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Old 02-09-08, 12:58 PM
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Thank you all for your suggestions...its certainly sounds like something I can handle.
 
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Old 02-10-08, 10:19 AM
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Practice, practice, practice on a small sample.

Then......practice one more time.

And make ABSOLUTELY certain any porous material under the pour (i.e. the grout) is COMPLETELY sealed. Otherwise you will end up with bubbles in the surface regardless of how much de-bubbling you do.

We want to see pics when you're done.
 
 

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