Lacquer finish help


  #1  
Old 02-09-08, 10:17 PM
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Unhappy Lacquer finish help

Hello everybody. My name is darshan and I currently work at an interior design shop with my friendís dad. Recently we have been picking up on wood refinishing. Currently I am working on three huge doors made from birch wood. Anyways long story short, when applying the final finish I am using a luster lacquer finish from Valspar. I am using a paint gun to apply the lacquer and when looking at the doors after I spray the finish, there are spots where you can see my paint strokes. some spots are perfectly uniformed but others are dull. I have tried thinning the lacquer and thickening it but it still seems to do the same thing. Is it my paint gun? The nozzle on the gun? I have no Idea. I am only 20 and I am very meticulous about my work and these lines on these doors are driving me crazy. Does anyone have any suggestions? Thank you for taking the time to read this, I will greatly appreciate your feedback. Thank you and have a great day.
 
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Old 02-10-08, 01:53 PM
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Darshan,
From what you've said, I haven't seen anything about using a sealer coat.
If you are using topcoat without sealing the surface first, the topcoat will literally soak into the wood through latex paint or wood stain.
Sealer is a heavy bodied lacquer that keeps the finish on the top of the surface. It has additives that make it easy to sand and get the surface nice and smooth before applying your topcoat.
If you aren't now, you need to be using fisheye elliminator. If your suppliers have it, get it. If they don't have it go to your local automotive paint supplier and get some. The most common brand available from auto paint suppliers is "Smoothie". Follow the instructions on the container. Add it to your sealer and topcoat faithfully.
Finish will not laydown smoothly on refinished woods due to contamination of the wood caused by furniture polish, oils, or even naturally from the wood. What you are actually doing is contaminating your finish to allow it to lay evenly on the surface.
I hope this addresses and answers your problem.

CD
 
  #3  
Old 02-11-08, 05:23 PM
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Smile Thank you

Hello thank you for your help. I do use a sanding sealer in between coats of stain to lock in the color. I realized today that the reason it was doing that is because the way I was spraying. The overspray was getting on to the parts I already sprayed. It looks real good now . Thank you.
 
 

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