oops. I burnished a danish oil finish


  #1  
Old 03-06-08, 04:21 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 710
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
oops. I burnished a danish oil finish

We had 6 old doors from our house completely stripped of 80 years of paint. I then used a 50:50 mixture of Watco Black walnut and Red mahogany. All the doors came out prety good, but one of them had a light area in the center (maybe residual paint residue). I then used a power sander with 220 grit paper to try to even it out. The danish oil must have still been not quite dry as it clogged the sandpaper several times. After I reoiled the door, it looks terrible. There are grey areas everywhere where the oil did not penetrate. What would be the best way to fix this? Thanks. Dave
PS I plan to wax the doors once the finish is totally cured.
 
  #2  
Old 03-06-08, 04:43 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 27,233
Received 1,958 Upvotes on 1,755 Posts
Your watco stain should say on the label that it takes 72 hours to completely dry and be ready for finish. I'd suggest that you immediately try to remove as much stain as possible with some rags and lacquer thinner. Do this over as large of an area as needed. (for instance if the spot is on the top rail, do the whole rail. If it's on a side stile, do the whole stile... not just a portion of it.) Mask off other areas to protect them and try not to get solvent on those areas.

Once you've removed enough finish so that your rags are coming back clean... then I'd suggest that you sand that same area by HAND with 150 grit sandpaper, sanding with the grain, using a sanding block if possible. Follow up with 180. I wouldn't recommend going any higher than 180, but you certainly can if you like. In my experience certain woods begin to repel stain (closes the grain and they don't accept dark pigments as well) if you sand the finish too smooth.

I'm guessing the grey areas are from the heat of the power sander as it ground the heated gooey finish (and maybe some of the old stripper / paint residue) into the grain of the wood. That was a bad idea, but I hope its not irrepairably damaged and that these ideas help you fix it and make it look good again.
 
  #3  
Old 03-07-08, 04:05 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 710
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Would restripping the door with chemicals work? (as a last resort only).
 
  #4  
Old 03-07-08, 05:27 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 27,233
Received 1,958 Upvotes on 1,755 Posts
I would think stripping would be your last resort. It's quite possible that the wood has been heated and burned by the sander you used. Danish oil combined with the friction and heat of the sander may have actually burned the wood, in which case, no amount of stripping or sanding will lighten the wood and accept stain in the same way as the surrounding wood that is undamaged.

If the wood is burned, you would need to sand, sand and sand some more to remove the burned spot. Doing that much sanding might create an obvious depression in the door, so you'd want to sand over a large area to avoid that.
 
  #5  
Old 03-07-08, 05:35 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 710
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
The sanded areas actually appear lighter than the unaffected areas and will not take the oil.
 
  #6  
Old 03-07-08, 06:21 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 27,233
Received 1,958 Upvotes on 1,755 Posts
a "burned" area does not necessarily appear darker, sorry if I gave that impression. Sanding an oil finish into a surface would superheat the oil, block the pores of the wood and giving it a waxy sheen that would repel the addition of further pigments. That is what I meant by "burned".
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: