Old, but VERY sturdy Kitchen Cabinet Refurnishing


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Old 04-04-08, 06:55 AM
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Old, but VERY sturdy Kitchen Cabinet Refurnishing

Hi:
All of my Kitchen Cabinet are old-fashioned Metal Cabinet which built in early '60 or so. However, due to 'rare' commodity to say the least, I want to 're-furbish' those old Metal Cabinet, ... it's 'doors.'

In the past, I put very fancy and expensive Contact Papaer with very clear-coated cover on the top. However, nowadays when I went several stores, there is NO contact-paper available which is similar to the contact-paper I put on every cabinet doors.

Besides, there are 'recessed hinges' that holding door getting deteriorating, then I want to replace all of 'recessed hinges' when I put some, good-quality cover to the doors of Metal Cabinet. There are two hinges, ... one hinge at the top and another at the bottom of each metal cabinet door.

First, .... what form of cover should I put on the old-fashioned Metal Cabinet? Rather than Contact Paper which does not last long, then I'm thinking of other form of cover, stronger than Contact Paper. What should I look for?

Second, .... where can I find those 'recessed hinges' holding Old-Fashioned Metal Kitchen Cabinet?

Thanks for any ideas and opinions on this regard.
 
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Old 04-04-08, 07:09 AM
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I can understand how contact paper wouldn't wear long. Are there any veneers that can be put over metal ?

Have you considered cleaning up the metal and spraying a nice finish on them? Automotive paint would be nice but an oil base enamel would also give a nice finish.

Probably your best bet with the hinges would be to either remove one or have a pic of one and check with some old timey hardware stores, if they don't have them maybe they would know where to look next.
 
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Old 04-04-08, 07:48 AM
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By hand it's going to be tough to do. I'd probably get it sprayed with lacquer.

If you don't have access to spray gear go to a local community college/autoshop or custom bike place they can definitley help you out. Community college would be the cheapest probably only have to pay for the lacquer.

If you like an industrial or hammered metal finish I did this by hand a little while ago. I used rustoleum hammer metal finish
with a roller on some mdf...it looked pretty cool.

http://www.rustoleum.com/CBGProduct.asp?pid=159

However if you want the flatness of contact paper...i think spraying would be your best option.
 
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Old 04-05-08, 05:09 AM
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Thanks for the responses.

As to painting Metal Cabinet, unlike wood, it's reasonable to think of 'painting. However, one thing which I would hesitate is that it's quite bland, like all-white painting that using in the Hospital. I love as lively as possible for the sake of kitchen-atmosphere. As my second-choice, I would prefer it to be 'wood-grain' paint, if such is avaiable. I know that's impossible.

On the otherhand, Contact Paper with Heavy-duty Clear contact on its top is very appealling. It's a VERY unique colored-mixed with flower with leaves, however as I stated in my previous post, it's no longer available. Those old-fashioned metal Cabinet with unique Contact-Paper has been for about fifteen years, then I do not mind 're-do' Contact Paper, if I could find one.

I might need to look for some web-sites which selling 'unique' contact paper, or eBay Sites.

Any other suggestions except Contact Paper would be grateful.

Thanks,
 
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Old 04-05-08, 10:22 AM
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While there isn't an actual wood grain paint, there is a faux painting technique that has been used for many years to make painted wood or metal appear to be stained/natural or raw wood, it's often called 'wood graining'

Another option would be to add stencil or other art work to the paint job.
 
 

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