Do you prefer a "wipe on" poly?


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Old 06-02-08, 10:03 PM
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Do you prefer a "wipe on" poly?

I'm scared to death to appy a poly coating to this antique table I refinished. I'm so afraid of the whitening/bubbles/peeling/brush markes/plastic look - all the horror stories I've been hearing. Wouldn't it be easier to just use an oil based wipe on? Will it protect just as well and will be easier to use? I was thinking about using the Minwax brand. I'll just be using it on the top and sides of the tabletop. I used tung oil on the chairs. I want the most natural finish I can get while protecting against water rings.

Oh, what about the tung oil/ poly mix stuff I heard about? Has anyone used it?

I'd love to hear your thoughts.

-Cassie
 
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Old 06-03-08, 04:17 AM
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Most water based finishes with leave brush marks, because they dry too quickly, it doesn't have time to flow out. Most oil based finishes dry slowly so the brush marks will flow and level out better. Wiping finishes are usually very slow drying, so no marks. Another option, spray can finishes(oil based). Same products, but definitely no brush marks, just be careful not to apply too heavily, then you gets runs, sags.
 
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Old 06-03-08, 04:41 AM
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Not to argue with Bill, but I use the Min-wax water-based poly all the time, including on some pieces that are a lot older than me. If done carefully you can achieve a smooth finish.
 
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Old 06-03-08, 04:51 AM
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IMO a wipe on poly doesn't apply a heavy enough coat to give good protection....... but I've never used it.

Oil base poly dries to a harder film than the water based which means it should wear longer. Oil does tend to flow better but use of a good brush and good brushing technique should allow either one to be applied with minimal or no brush marks.
 
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Old 06-03-08, 08:05 AM
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Thanks for responding so quickly!!

Bill - Have you ever tried the wipe on? Do you like that look the best? Also - would I ever use those black painting sponges (on a stick) instead of a brush to eliminate brush lines?

Mark - How do you know that the wipe on poly won't offer adequate protection if you've never used it? Did you read it somewhere?

Thanks!
 
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Old 06-03-08, 10:06 AM
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I've used the Min Wax wipe on poly on a couple of projects. I was pleased with the results, but I don't have an answer for durability. Both projects were pieces that won't get a lot of abuse. The finish is oil based and I used 3 coats so I expect it will last.

I saw a guy on a DIY show using a tung oil, wipe on poly mix. I'm going to try that on my next finishing job.
 
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Old 06-03-08, 12:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Cassie30
Mark - How do you know that the wipe on poly won't offer adequate protection if you've never used it? Did you read it somewhere?

My knowledge of painting, makes me believe that wiping on a finish can't produce the same film thickness that brush or spray gives. The thinner the coating is applied, the less protection is given.
 
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Old 06-03-08, 01:41 PM
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Mark - I don't doubt you are correct about the thickness, but with wood finishes the key to a deep finish is multiple thin coats with sanding in between. I typically will use 3 coats with a poly finish. I've used as many as 4-5 to get the results I wanted.
 
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Old 06-03-08, 02:53 PM
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Then I could use several coats and get the protection that I need with the wipe on?

I am really intrigued by the tung oil/ poly mix. I'm in love with the way oils add to the depth of the wood. Could you share your learnings about this method or provide a link to where I could get more information?
 
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Old 06-04-08, 04:07 AM
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You may have to apply more coats of a wipe on to get the results you want. Yes, it is a shinner coat, but it is also easier to control. I have used wipe on finishes of several varieties, and they always provided excellent protection and beautiful results.

I have done several replica black powder guns with tung oil. If you know how corrosive black powder is,..........those guns look like they were just finished after years of use and cleaning.
 
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Old 06-23-08, 08:50 PM
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i just built a beautiful table and finished it with wipe on minwax oil based. it turned out awesome!! i had never used it before or any wipe on so i was a little nervous but it turned out perfect. i think i applied about six coats and i sanded between each coat with steel wool and then after i sanded it i cleaned it with (i can't remember what they call the sticky cloth that you can buy) but that's what i used. the key is to just wipe it on fast and then let it be. it's a little tricky on a big surface because you're tempted to do a final wipe over everything once you get it all on but it doesn't look as good when you do that. eventually i figured out that it looks best to just get it down pretty good and then let it level itself out.
 
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Old 07-01-08, 02:54 PM
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I just wanted to mention that I've used a spray poly before with great results. It's easy and quick, which makes many coats much easier.
 
 

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