Mitre saw question


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Old 12-02-08, 06:08 PM
C
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Mitre saw question

After beginning to build some radiator covers and soon a dining table, I bought an entry-level mitre saw, a cheap Ryobi 10". I put it together and it seems to be solid, its got a laser and all the fixings, but it doesn't slide.

Question is, am I really limited to cutting only 2X6's with this saw, or is there a technique for cutting both sides of a wide plank in a way that lines up perfectly? I'm leaning toward "no" but thought I'd ask.

Thanks
 
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Old 12-02-08, 06:50 PM
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Typically most construction trim people will use a 14" miter saw that slides very much like a radial arm saw.
CD
 
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Old 12-03-08, 04:16 AM
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A miter saw is for cross cutting, not ripping. For ripping you need a table saw or radial arm saw. And for quality precision work a cabinet saw is best, but not easily moved and expensive. There are a number of more portable table saws available for jobsite work, that work fairly well for precision work, and won't bust the budget.
 
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Old 12-03-08, 07:06 AM
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Exclamation

Originally Posted by Chris Mullin
After beginning to build some radiator covers and soon a dining table, I bought an entry-level mitre saw, a cheap Ryobi 10". I put it together and it seems to be solid, its got a laser and all the fixings, but it doesn't slide.

Question is, am I really limited to cutting only 2X6's with this saw, or is there a technique for cutting both sides of a wide plank in a way that lines up perfectly? I'm leaning toward "no" but thought I'd ask.

Thanks
You are right. The answer is no. You should always buy the best tools that you can afford. In this case you need at least a 12" compound miter saw. Anything bigger is better.
 
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Old 12-03-08, 10:18 AM
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Actually the answer is yes. I "survived".with a 10" Craftsman miter saw for a lot of years. Posters are correct about a sliding miter saw being the best for this work, but sometimes you have to make do with what you have. Your saw can cut up to 2X8s. A pain in the butt on a jobsite where time is money, but no big deal on a DIY project. If you have a lot of dimensional lumber to cut, you might consider buying a circular saw.

It's important to have solid work support on both ends of the miter saw. They need to extend out at least as long as your workpieces. To cut a 2X6 just cut the piece to the limit of the saw, lift the blade out and flip the workpiece. Obviously alignment is important to get a good cut. You can sometimes use stops to get perfect alignment, but a laser also does a good job.
 
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Old 12-03-08, 02:43 PM
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You just came up with justification for a 12" slider.

And, of course, maybe a table saw as well.
 
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Old 12-03-08, 03:39 PM
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Thanks to all

After checking out Home Depot for something COMPLETELY unrelated, I wandered into the tool dept. and found a very similar Ryobi Mitre saw that has sliders...about $100 more but seems worth it, so I'm boxing up my first one and moving on to the slider.

Thanks for the input, and I agree that I should try and buy the best tool I can afford. Cheers.
 
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Old 12-04-08, 07:07 AM
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Cool

Originally Posted by cwbuff
Actually the answer is yes. I "survived".with a 10" Craftsman miter saw for a lot of years. Posters are correct about a sliding miter saw being the best for this work, but sometimes you have to make do with what you have. Your saw can cut up to 2X8s. A pain in the butt on a jobsite where time is money, but no big deal on a DIY project. If you have a lot of dimensional lumber to cut, you might consider buying a circular saw.

It's important to have solid work support on both ends of the miter saw. They need to extend out at least as long as your workpieces. To cut a 2X6 just cut the piece to the limit of the saw, lift the blade out and flip the workpiece. Obviously alignment is important to get a good cut. You can sometimes use stops to get perfect alignment, but a laser also does a good job.
I too have survived with a 10" miter saw, but the key word was PERFECT!.I have done a lot of things without the proper tools, but I have also been doing it for a LONG time. It is not the TOOLS that make the craftsman, but the versatility!
 
 

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