What paint to use on wooden surface fixed with putty?


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Old 07-03-10, 09:58 PM
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Question What paint to use on wooden surface fixed with putty?



Hello All..
Great work youre doing here..

So I'm building a sound system for my home theatre and I used peach wood to build the boxes that will be housing the speakers. and I used putty to fix the holes and dents in the wood.. and since I used nails to put the wooden pieces together, I put the nails so deep into the wood so I can hide their heads, and filled these holes with putty..

Now I'm at the painting stage.. I want to paint the boxes black.. a total black to cover up the wood and its flaws..

I'm not sure what kind of paint to use.. I need paint that will stay on the putty and also will cover it up so that you cant tell which parts had putty on..

someone I know suggested synthetic paint (oil based paint) but I'm afraid that it will make the surface look cheap..

So what is my best choice here??
 
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Old 07-04-10, 03:43 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

Why do you think the use of oil base paint/primer would make it look cheap?
Usually an oil based coating will give a better looking job than latex will. Often oil base will bond to the substrate better than it's latex counterpart.

I'd apply an oil base primer [preferably a dark grey] and then a couple of coats of a black oil base enamel, sanding [and removing the dust] between coats.
 
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Old 07-05-10, 09:05 PM
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I believe I think it looks cheap because usually people use a brush to apply the synthetic paint. and since its thick (the synthetic paint), and it dries kinda fast, you can usually see the brush strokes which gives that cheap look I'm talking about.

I think your idea of sanding the surface between coats will help a lot..

Thank you for answering
 
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Old 07-06-10, 03:46 AM
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Basically there are 2 types of paint brushes, synthetic bristles [often polyester/nylon] and natural bristles [usually hog hair] Natural bristle brushes can only be used with solvent based paint, water ruins the bristles... but a natural bristle brush leaves less brush marks. Also thinning the paint a tad will often make it flow together better [less brush marks]
 
 

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