Refinish oak table/chairs inside


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Old 09-19-10, 12:39 PM
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Refinish oak table/chairs inside

I have read through previous posts for the last hour and found good stuff but not exactly what I'm looking for. I have a heavy oak trestle table and chairs that I want to (at best) refinish and stain darker, or (at worst) just clean and brighten the wood. The table is natural finish, but I don't know what the protective coat is.
Here's my problem: I live in a condo and getting the table outside to work on it would be difficult if not impossible. I would like to find a method that I can use inside with the table sitting in my dining area (with floor and other areas covered, of course). The table is solid wood, dingy from wear, with some nicks and stains but otherwise in good shape so I don't want to spend money on a replacement.
What do you recommend? Thanks.
PS. I wanted to post a photo but I can't find the link. ??)
 
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Old 09-19-10, 02:15 PM
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here's a link with info for posting pics;
http://forum.doityourself.com/electr...your-post.html

Generally oil base poly can be applied over most clear finishes. It should be sanded lightly first. It would be a good idea to test a hidden area first to make sure the poly will work. The biggest issue you'll have with the oil base poly on the interior is the odor. Having an open window with a fan helping to exhaust the paint fumes will help.

You could also use a waterbased poly but I'm not overly confident in it's ability to adhere long term to solvent based finishes.
 
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Old 09-19-10, 04:20 PM
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I just finished refinishing some unfinished solid oak furniture that I finished 25 years ago because of a few dings and dents. It had gone through 6 moves and 30,000 miles. Originally, I used MinWax Polyurethane over a stain and it worked great but nothing can prevent some damage and I had the time and opportunity to make it good for another 25 years or more.

I hate chemicals, so I did a good job of sanding with multiple grades and used several grades and wiped everything as I went.

After that, I applied a coat of semi-gloss because I did not want to use gloss (too formal). I used a fast drying and the only mistake I made was having too much ventilation and them got rid of the dust that was drawn in from elsewhere. I got it looking good in a dry dust free area, closed the door in my townhouse and waited in to check later. The odor was not a problem and there was no outside dust introduced. I lightly prepped after about 6 hours and recoated, waited 24 hours and went over the iron hard, durable surface with a 0000 pad and am set for another 25 years (if I live that long) before the next resurfacing before I do it again.

If you start with good, quality wood furniture, it is predictable, but the refinishing can be more difficult if you do not know what you are dealing with. It was easy to start with good, solid furniture and no veneers.

Dick
 
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Old 09-19-10, 08:27 PM
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Thanks for your replies. So are you both saying that all I need to do is sand and re-coat with oil based poly? What about re-staining it darker? Would I need to do more than just sanding? Or is there any kind of wood stripper/cleaner that doesn't have to be hosed off but could be wiped off?

Forgive me if these are dumb questions!
 
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Old 09-20-10, 04:52 AM
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The dumb questions are the ones you don't ask and plow ahead anyway

There are 2 ways to make the piece darker. To restain, you would need to either sand off or chemically remove all of the current finish and stain. Generally chemical stains are brushed on, let set/work and then scraped off with a wide putty knife. Some strippers need to be wiped down with a solvent to neutralize them [after you're done] You would then sand to finish getting it ready.

Another method is to apply a tinted poly [like minwax's polyshades] It can be applied over the old finish with a light sanding. It must be applied evenly!! Because there is color in the poly, lap marks, runs, puddles, drips, etc will all be darker than the surrounding areas. Thin or missed areas would be lighter. Tinted poly should not be over brushed. Once your done with the tiinted poly it's best to apply a coat of clear poly over the tinted poly to protect the color.
 
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Old 09-20-10, 10:03 AM
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Perfect, marksr! That's what I needed. I appreciate the help!
 
 

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