Using a countersink


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Old 11-05-10, 07:09 PM
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Using a countersink

I have a question about using a countersink. I'm not 100% sure where to position the collar on the countersink. Should I set the screw right where the countersink begins (as shown in the image)?

Also, how do I know how far to press the countersink into the wood? Is it just a matter of experience/trial and error? I tried a few test holes and the first few I pressed too hard and
made the countersink hole to big. But after that, I used lighter pressure and got it to where the
head of the screw was almost flush with the wood. Is there a technique to is?

Thanks,

Andy

DIY pictures by hikerguy1 - Photobucket
 
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Old 11-06-10, 06:04 AM
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You didn't say handheld or drill press, but I'm assuming handheld. In that case it is largely a case of practice makes perfect and/or trial and error. Much easier with a drill press as you can test on a piece of scrap until you have the depth correct and then drill away. With a handheld you are the depth stop. Always best to be a little short of deep enough so you can sneak up on the proper depth; once you go too deep it's tough to undo. Also very easy to go from "not quite enough" to "Oops".
 
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Old 11-06-10, 06:18 AM
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The screw you are using needs no countersink, especially a #8 like you have pictured. The bit should be no bigger than the "shank" of the screw, excluding the threads. Most likely you need a 1/16th bit. Countersinking can be accomplished with a bitless countersink once your hole is drilled. Here's an example: Amazon.com: General Tools 195-3/4 3/4-Inch Countersink Bit: Power & Hand Tools: Reviews, Prices & more

Larry

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Old 11-06-10, 01:06 PM
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Yes, I'm using a hand drill. I was kinda guessing it would be by feel. Chandler, thanks for the link.
Why do you say that size screw needs no countersink? If I want it flush, are you recommending I just screw it in to be just below the surface? I was looking at Rockler.com and they have a countersink kit and it goes down to that size screw. Just curious. I'm all new to this, so I'll take any advice I can get when it comes to woodworking.

Thanks,

Andy
 
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Old 11-06-10, 01:48 PM
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They do make countersinks with an adjustable collar for depth..but they will leave marks on the surface.
 
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Old 11-07-10, 04:51 AM
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Hi Andy - A #8 woodscrew will tighten flush in softwood but probably not in a hardwood. I prefer to countersink screws to just a bit below flush. Make sure that you use the correct size pilot hole. You can download a chart off the internet. Just Google "wood screw pilot holes" for a bunch of options.

Most countersink sets come in screw size 6,8,10. I have a couple of countersink sets and all I can say is that when you are using a hand drill it takes a little practice. If my screwheads are going to be left exposed (and I care what it looks like) I will flip the screw and use the head as a gauge. You can also use the flat end of a drill bit the same size as the screw head.
 
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Old 11-07-10, 05:23 PM
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Andy, my terminology gets wiggly sometimes. I really meant your screw may not need a pilot. Countersink, sure to hide the head. Sorry for the confusion.
 
 

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