Painting New Adirondack Chair and Adding Artwork


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Old 05-27-11, 10:10 PM
K
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Painting New Adirondack Chair and Adding Artwork

I'm new to both this site and to wood painting/finishing. Please let me know if this plan is flawed in any way.

I have a new unassembled unfinished fir wood Adirondack chair. I want the chair to look like a Margaritaville chair, minus the hefty price tag

I obviously want the chair to look gorgeous, but I also want it to survive the Florida heat and humidity. I plan on first using Valspar Oil Based Exterior Primer

Next I will paint each piece of wood two different colors of Rust-Oleum oil-based protective enamel (2 coats) Amazon.com: Rust Oleum 7771-402 Rust-Oleum Protective Enamels: Home Improvement
One color (white) has a semi-gloss finish while the other color (blue) has a gloss finish. Should I have stuck to an acrylic final coat instead of this oil-based enamel? If I do use these oil-based enamels, should they both have a gloss finish instead of a semi-gloss finish? I hear the gloss is less likely to stick to clothing.

For the backrest, I plan on cutting a tropical poster (paper) to the exact dimensions of the vertical wooden boards. These will be glued onto the backrest. To waterproof and protect this art design, I want to apply a high gloss finish such as Envirotex Lite Gallon Kit, Envirotex Lite®, Pour On Finish
This is the same clear stuff that you find on bar tables to protect against liquid. I will also apply this to the top of the armrests to protect them from drinks (not sure if this is overkill). Is the pour-on finish my best bet to protect the artwork on the chair from the weather. This stuff is expensive, difficult to apply, and I have to use a blow torch to get rid of the bubbles. Please let me know if there is an easier method out there that is weatherproof.

Sorry about all the questions, but this is my first time painting wood so I'm a little confused. Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance.


Engineering Undergrad
University of Florida
 

Last edited by kenshin305; 05-27-11 at 11:35 PM.
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Old 05-28-11, 03:35 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

Normally I'd say the oil base finish coat would be best since oil enamel dries to a harder film than latex and would wear better but I used to live/work in fla and know how hard the fla sun is on oil base coatings. While an oil base primer would still be a good choice, 2 coats of an exterior latex would be better for the top coat.

I don't know how your proposed clear coat will weather, you might e-mail the company and ask if it's rated for exterior use. I do know that coatings like a spar varnish/poly won't hold up long in direct sunlight.
 
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Old 05-28-11, 08:06 AM
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Thanks for the quick response marksr.

I have seen in these forums that an exterior acrylic should be used for outdoor furniture. Is this better than your suggested exterior latex, or are these both the same? Also, is it best for the top coat to have a glossy finish?

I looked into the pour-on clear coat and it does not weather well outside. So I'm still researching how to protect the artwork from direct sun damage over time. I know poster, or any printouts fade over time in the sun. If anyone has any suggestions/solutions, it would be greatly appreciated.


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Old 05-28-11, 05:51 PM
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If I'm not mistaken, all exterior latex paints are acrylic based. Generally the more gloss the paint has, the better it will clean and repel dirt.
 
 

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