painting over white washed furniture?

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Old 06-27-12, 10:01 AM
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Question painting over white washed furniture?

Hi - I recently undertook a huge project to refinish a 7 piece dinette set (never again!). I used furniture to strip the original stain and varnish away, and sanded everything smooth and conditioned before beginning to white wash with one coat of Varathane premium stain in Sun bleached (link below).

I'm not happy with the result; it is a lot more white than I expected and not much of the wood grain is showing through. So I'd like to switch gears and perhaps go with a solid, creamier coloured paint. Please tell me I don't have to strip the furniture all over again to do this! I am hoping I can just paint right over top of the one coat of wash. Does anyone have some advise, as well as a brand/type of paint that would work best for this? Is spray paint an option, to achieve a nice even coat?

Thanks in advance!

Varathane | Stain Vara Premium Sun Blchd 946Ml | Home Depot Canada
 
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Old 06-27-12, 10:27 AM
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You don't need to strip off the new finish but you will need to sand and use a solvent based primer. Either an oil base enamel undercoater or pigmented shellac will adhere fine. Oil base enamels dry the hardest [wears the best] but will yellow some as it ages, waterborne enamel dries to a film almost as hard as oil base but won't yellow [my choice] There can be a big difference in latex enamels. Cheap latex enamel is prone to chip and peel no matter how good the prep is. Top line latex enamels will do a decent job but won't wear as well as the harder waterborne or oil enamel.

Both the primer and finish can be sprayed if you have the place and equipment to do so. I would not recommend using rattle cans as it's too hard to get a good fluid even coat..... they'll also wear your finger out
 
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Old 06-27-12, 11:22 AM
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I guess I will have to go with my trusty old paint brush.... I imagine the equipment is pretty costly to rent and not a great investment for a novice.

Thanks!
 
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Old 06-27-12, 02:27 PM
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A nice looking job can be had using a brush. Thin the paint slightly so it flows well and then sanding between coats will remove most if not all of the brush marks. For those who have a rough time mastering a brush, a roller can be used. There won't be any brush marks but the flat surface will have a bit of an orange peel finish. IMO a 1/4" mohair roller cover does the best job for rolling enamel that isn't 'tipped off' with a brush.
 
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