How to remove scratches from freshly stained furniture

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Old 10-07-12, 08:19 AM
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How to remove scratches from freshly stained furniture

Hi,

Please bear with me.
Is there any way to remove scratches left by sand paper from a mahonany bureau? I was trying to match the mahongany color, and used two different colors. I misunderstood the directions and sanded without sealing In between the colors, I ran sand paper over the surface. I now have light scratches over the surface of a bureau of a freshly stained bureau.
I am thinking of restripping to remove the scratches but really do not want to do this all over again. Is there any way to resolve this without restripping? Thanks!
 

Last edited by hope2finish; 10-07-12 at 08:55 AM.
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Old 10-07-12, 11:21 AM
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Welcome to the forums! You say you have scratches on the "stained" part. Is there a polyurethane finish over the stain, or is it just stain?? You may can reduce the severity of the scratches by going with a much finer sandpaper and finish with a 2000 grit. Our paint guy will be along shortly, so hang in there. In addition, pictures would really help us see what you see. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
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Old 10-07-12, 01:05 PM
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How long ago did you put the stain on?

If you applied the stain today, then reapply it again. Do a test area first to make sure it doesn't go darker than desired. You can usually apply stain again before the fist coat is completely dry and it won't make the area darker.

Otherwise, see if mineral spirits will remove some of the stain you already applied. I don't think using stripper again will be needed in this instance.
 
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Old 10-07-12, 01:14 PM
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Smile Pictures of scratches.

Name:  Bureau 101.jpg
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Size:  27.6 KBName:  White stain.jpg
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Size:  15.6 KB

Here are the pictures. I hope I did this correctly I also included a hard to remove white mark that stripper would not remove.
 
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Old 10-07-12, 01:17 PM
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Thursday

Thank you for responding. I applied the stripper Thursday, and then again on Friday.
 
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Old 10-08-12, 05:49 AM
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What type of stain are you using? If it's just stain, resanding with a finer grit should remove the scratches. The pics look more like there is poly on the stain - did you use a tinted poly like Minwax's PolyShades?

When sanding stained wood [or getting it ready for stain] you must ALWAYS sand with the direction of the grain. I've never seen any reason to use a grit finer than 220 on wood/finish. Poly will turn somewhat white after sanding but the next coat brings the color back.... or like droo said - wiping it off with paint thinner.

What kind of stripper are you using?
 
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Old 10-14-12, 09:27 AM
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Hello,

Sorry for the delayed response. I was using Citristrip. I did use mineral spirits to go over the the surface, but it did not help. So, I then tried using a stronger stripper only on the top surface. The stronger stripper was far worse then the Citristrip. I then had to use Citristrip again to reactivate the stronger stripper. That was successful. I wiped it down, removed the residue with mineral spirits, and then use a mild solution of murphys oil soap to remove the residue of mineral spirits. I made sure it was dry before staining again. I then waited a few days until it was "cured" and use an aerosol sanding sealant. This was yesterday. The top surface of the bureau had a white film. The instructions on the can said wait 1/2 an hour before it dries to sand. I waited about 45 minutes, and then tested a small area. Again more scratches. This time I immediately used a dry cloth to go over the entire surface to remove the film. Needless to say, at this point I am very reluctant to do ANY SANDING. I did use a 320 grit to do the sanding. 220 seemed too abrasive. The stain was an Minwax oil based stain. I read the above posting about "poly will turn somewhat white" This turned white before sanding. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks!
 
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Old 10-14-12, 10:13 AM
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I'm not understanding what you exact problem is. Of course there will be scratches when you sand it. The following coat of finish will fill in those scratches and they will disappear.
 
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Old 10-14-12, 10:14 AM
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It's not really clear exactly what your objective was from the start. Did you strip the original finish in order to simply refinish the piece or trying to repair a section? In any case, after stripping I would wipe with mineral spirits, sand smooth, stain (is it natural undyed mahogany? why stain at all?) and apply first coat of finish. I would not sand an oil based stain, you can lightly sand between finish coats with the grain direction. When wiping with mineral spirits, just let it dry, The Murphy's oil soap (on bare or stained wood) was a mistake and may have caused the white blush. As someone else mentioned, there seems to be a gloss finish in your pics, doesn't look like pure oil stain. If the scratches were in your first coat of poly, they can be sanded out with finer grit or they would have been filled in by the second coat.
 
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Old 10-14-12, 12:58 PM
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My objective

My objective was to keep the natural mahogany color. However, due to my oversanding to remove the layers of white paint that were in the groves, I also overstripped & oversanded in some areas. I then tried to fix this problem by using a red stain, and then used an additional darker stain. Someone gave me instructions to sand after sealing. I was also told to "prep" the wood with wiping it down i.e. simple green. etc.
I have never done this before. The person who gave me the instructions to sand after sealing was a expert, and he wrote them down. I just followed the instructions. Too bad I did not have this website before I started the project. Since I am not experienced with this, I did not know that the scratches would be filled in after I finished. What would you have used to prep before staining?
 
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Old 10-14-12, 01:19 PM
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Prep before staining? Given that it had a finish on it, I would have stripped the surface and then sanded - 220 grit as the final grit, more aggressive grits only if they had been needed; would have been based on how the surface looked after cleaning off the stripper and old finish.

Also, stain works by soaking into the surface and once this has been done, subsequent coats will not soak in and therefore only one coat of stain should be used.
 
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Old 10-14-12, 01:19 PM
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The sealer is fine and you are supposed to sand it after you apply it. You also have to make sure you put a thick enough layer of the sealer on. When you sanded the sealer, did it remove any of the stain? That would be a good indicator that you didn't have enough on.
 
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Old 10-14-12, 07:28 PM
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No, there was no stain removed after I sealed, then sanded. It just looked badly scratched. Also, the Minwax I am using is suppose to "penetrate, stain and seal." That might explain the "gloss" I don't know if that makes a difference. It is actually called Minwax "Wood Finish" The other Minwax products did not match the color I wanted. Should I continue using a sealer?
 
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Old 10-14-12, 07:55 PM
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The reason it looked badly scratched is because it was badly scratched. That is what an abrasive will do. The reason you sand between coats is to remove imperfections in the previous coat of finish. It is also required for some finishes so the next layer has something to grab onto.

What is the sealer you are using? What is the top coat you plan to use on top of the sealer?
 
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Old 10-14-12, 08:33 PM
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It is Mohawk Clear Lacquer Sanding Sealer Spray. I have Mohawk Tone Finish clear satin sheen finish.
 
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Old 10-15-12, 04:32 PM
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You said the sealer was a spray can, is the Tone Finish also a spray can?
 
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Old 10-15-12, 08:18 PM
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Yes it is. At this point, I am seeing it is not such a good idea. The lighting for spraying would have to be perfect. Brushing may be a better way to go
 
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Old 10-16-12, 04:31 PM
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Trying to spray large areas with a rattle can is very difficult. You need to spray a wet layer of finish on. It will take a lot of those cans to do it properly. I agree a brushed on finish will be better suited.
 
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Old 10-16-12, 08:16 PM
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Thanks, is there any you would recommend?
 
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Old 10-17-12, 04:46 PM
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I like to use the Minwax Polycrylic for stuff at home because it is water based and cleans up easily. Another good choice is their Polyurethane.
 
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Old 10-20-12, 06:52 PM
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To sand or not to sand

Hello,

I decided to use Polyurethane Clear Satin. I like the result. However, on one the side I see the drip marks from the brush.. I just did this today. The instructions on the can says wait 3-4 hours and use 220 grit sandpaper. I am reluctant to sand for fear of messing it up. I know that you are suppose to sand with the grain. Will I be able to sand away the drip marks from the paint bursh? It is only on the one side of the bureau. Also are there any circumstances when professional do not sand after finishing?
 
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Old 10-20-12, 08:08 PM
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You need to sand between coats. To get rid of the drips, use a block of wood to back up your sandpaper. That will ensure you are mainly sanding the drip and not the finish around it until you get it level. As an alternative, you can use a razor blade to scrape the drips away and then sand. Remeber that the drips will take far longer to dry than the rest of the application. If it appears the drips are still wet when you begin to address them, give it more time to dry.

Just so it is clear to you, you only sand between coats. When you put the last coat of finish on, you do not sand it!
 
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Old 10-21-12, 05:43 AM
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Sometimes it's better to take a razor blade and carefully cut the drip off, then sand lightly and recoat.
 
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Old 10-22-12, 07:58 AM
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You asked:

Also are there any circumstances when professional do not sand after finishing?
After the final coat, sure, it's pretty common not to sand. Between coats, however, you do need to scuff sand with 220 grit to promote adhesion between the layers.
 
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Old 11-10-12, 08:41 AM
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sanding between coats of finish

Hello all,

I applied finish and sanded before I applied a final coat of finish. The final coat did not dry properly and I could still see the scratches left from sanding. I then applied an additional coat of finish and I could still see the scratches. I just applied mineral spirits and it took off some of the finish. I then applied a thin coat of Citristrip and it crystalized. The temps are about 50
I am doing this in the garage where it is warmer. I am hoping to apply another coat of Citristrip as the temps climb. Is there anything else I can do here? I thought using mineral spirits would help. Will I need to restrip? Thank you-
 

Last edited by hope2finish; 11-10-12 at 09:59 AM.
  #26  
Old 11-10-12, 09:58 AM
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No. Sand again and apply a fresh coat. If you used 220 before, try going to 320. The scratches will be finer and should hide better with the final coat.

Did you mean the scratches from the very beginning?
 
  #27  
Old 11-10-12, 11:30 AM
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220 grit should be fine enough. Is all the sanding being done with the direction of the grain? Cross sanding marks can be difficult to remove and may require a coarser grit to get rid of the deeper scratches and then a fine grit to finish.
 
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Old 11-10-12, 11:34 AM
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Finish

Hello, thank you for responding. This was only from sanding after finishing. After Hurricane Sandy, it left the east coast damp. Although, I knew this the garage tends to be warm during the day. I though would be ok applying an additional coat of finish. I am sanding in the direction of of grain.
 
  #29  
Old 11-10-12, 11:40 AM
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Ok, you've gotten me confused

In post #25 you talk about stripping the wood and now you ask about applying more finish. I'm having a hard time grasping what you are doing. The only reason to use a stripper would be to get back down to raw wood. It's never used between coats of finish.
 
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Old 11-10-12, 01:16 PM
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I would like to add that cold temperatures will make it harder for the finish to flow out into a smooth film. It is possible that the finish and the wood were too cold.
 
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Old 11-10-12, 04:51 PM
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Generally it's ok to apply coatings if the air temp and more importantly the substrate [wood] temp is 50 degrees and rising. Cool and/or damp conditions will slow down the drying time.
 
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