How to restore/maintain teak dining table

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-14-12, 11:48 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 11
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
How to restore/maintain teak dining table

I have a Danish Teak dining table that I would like to refresh without a lot of effort. It has some light scratches and some light spots, but is in pretty good shape, overall.

I'd love to know what kind of finish the table had originally. It's smooth, and satiny, but some of the grain still shows through. I wonder if it's a varnish or a sprayed lacquer.

I also wonder if this kind of finish is supposed to have regular maintenance (every 6 months or a year). If so, is that what teak oil is for? Would the maintenance be the first step to take before trying the restor-a-finish?

I used a cotton swab with some nail polish remover (primarily acetone), and it didn't seem to affect the finish of the one table leg at all.

I tried some lacquer thinner, but it didn't seem to affect the finish, either. It didn't get sticky or tacky while lightly rubbing it on a table leg.

I also tried some isopropyl alcohol (70%) and that dulled the finish a bit when it dried and a bit of color came off on the cotton swab.

I'm considering using Restor-a-Finish, because I've read good things about it. I have an old can of restor-a-finish (wrong color) that says "do not use on polyurethane". The new can I just bought says "do not apply polyurethane on top of restore-a-finish". Why are restor-a-finish and polyurethane incompatible?

If I put on the restor-a-finish, am I committing to that to maintain the finish in the future?

Thanks in advance...
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-15-12, 12:44 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,489
Received 32 Votes on 24 Posts
Teak is a naturally oily wood and some finishes do not like teak. I had several teak bookcases in my old house some twelve years ago and also a teak parquet floor. I used teak oil on all of them.

I'd say that if you have any staining to try some fine sandpaper on them and then spot treat these areas with teak oil and let it dry for a day or two before doing the teak oil all over.
 
  #3  
Old 10-15-12, 06:24 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,336
Received 49 Votes on 46 Posts
Never heard of restor-a-finish so I can't comment on that but Furd is right about teak being oily and trying the oil.
 
  #4  
Old 10-19-12, 12:43 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 11
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the replies. I *DID* decided to go with the teak oil over the Restor-a-Finish.

I used some super-fine (0000) steel wool to rub it in. I did 3 applications, waiting about a day in between each application. It's looking *really* good now (though I'm just looking at by the lighting in the garage), so I'm pretty happy with the result. I didn't do any sanding because the damage was pretty slight and I was curious just how effective the steel wool would be.

So, I guess I'm signing up for a teak oil re-treatment about every 6 months, or so, eh?

I figure if it turns out to not hold up to daily use very well, I can always oil it up good, then put a couple of thin coats of polyurethane on it down the road.

I read someplace that the Teak Oil (I used Watco) has some varnish in it, but it doesn't say that on the can (the Watco Danish Oil *does* say it has varnish). So, I'm kind of assuming that the original finish is primarily varnish.
 
  #5  
Old 10-19-12, 06:20 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,170
Received 131 Votes on 117 Posts
Poly doesn't always work well over rubbing oils so if you go that route - do a small test area first! I don't remember ever having worked with teak but seems like I've heard that poly/varnish doesn't work that well with it.
 
  #6  
Old 10-19-12, 02:12 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,489
Received 32 Votes on 24 Posts
Unless your table is outside it shouldn't need re-oiling but maybe once every few years.
 
  #7  
Old 10-19-12, 08:59 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 11
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I hope you're right Furd. We'll see how it holds up to the daily use and abuse around my household (small munchkins abound).
 
  #8  
Old 02-02-14, 07:22 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 11
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Smile

Just a follow-up to say that, after 18 months, the finish on the table is holding up great! I've been very impressed at how effective restoring the natural finish with teak oil has been.
 
  #9  
Old 02-03-14, 04:22 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,170
Received 131 Votes on 117 Posts
thanks for the update
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: