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Painting wood furniture with satin-finish latex paint, but want a glossy finish

Painting wood furniture with satin-finish latex paint, but want a glossy finish

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  #1  
Old 10-24-12, 09:56 AM
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Painting wood furniture with satin-finish latex paint, but want a glossy finish

i am brand-new to this forum and this is my very first thread - yay!

i am repainting a wood headboard for my daughter's bed.
i have sanded the original finish, then primed (spray on kilz) and then sanded again, and now i am finally ready to paint.

here is my question: i bought a sample of paint which ends up being generous enough to get the job done (i am upholstering it as well, so there is minimal wood that needs painting) in the interest of economy and the environment, i would like to use the paint sample rather than toss it, but want a semi-gloss finish for aesthetics. is there a product that i can finish with that will give me this desired end without compromising the integrity of the satin latex? or should i just go buy the semi-gloss paint.

thank you for any help, and please be gentle with this newbie
 

Last edited by carolina p; 10-24-12 at 09:57 AM. Reason: typos
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  #2  
Old 10-24-12, 10:27 AM
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Welcome to the forums.

First, your primer - I have never used Kilz in a spray can but their latex product has known adhesion issues, is yours oil based?

Second, paint samples are often missing some of the ingredients which provide durability for the paint, they are not meant to be used as a final product. Between that and the sheen issue, I would go buy a can of their paint in the sheen you desire.
 
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Old 10-24-12, 01:42 PM
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mitch17,
i never even considered that the paint sample could be 'inferior' to the actual paint...guess that does answer my question beautifully.
thanks so much for your reply.
 
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Old 10-24-12, 01:56 PM
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btw, the kilz spray primer IS oil-based
 
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Old 10-24-12, 02:34 PM
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Ya, I think all the spray primers/coatings are solvent based and know for sure the Kilz is.

Just to reinforce what Mitch said, the paint sample containers have a formulation that is only concerned about color - it's not a paint that is intended for wear. I suppose you could buy a semi-gloss waterbased poly but IMO getting the correct paint in the right sheen is a better idea!
 
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Old 10-24-12, 02:37 PM
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Good, you should be fine with that.
 
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Old 10-24-12, 06:26 PM
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marksr, thanks for your response too.

guess those 2 coats of paint i applied today (before checking for responses) can now be considered 'tinted primer'...i am wondering now, if this will interfere with the real paint, though...
 
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Old 10-25-12, 05:33 AM
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I don't know for sure To be safe, I'd recommend sanding the paint with 120-150 grit before applying the 'real' paint. Hopefully that will insure a problem free top coat.
 
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Old 10-25-12, 05:49 PM
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I think those grits may be too course. I would go with 220.
 
  #10  
Old 10-26-12, 04:56 AM
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The reason for the coarser grit is to make sure the sample paint is well adhered to the substrate. If it strips the paint - it needs to come off. Latex paint is fairly coarse and should cover any 120 grit sanding scratches but you could always follow the 120 grit sanding with 180 or 220 which would eliminate any chance of scratches showing thru the top coat.
 
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