Refinishing the dining table

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-31-12, 06:25 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Refinishing the dining table

Hi,

Can someone help me provide any information about how to refinish my dining table. I have this table from 3 years and it looks like this now (Picture attached). I am not sure what type of wood it is.

How do I make it look good again? Any help will be appreciated. I am a complete novice who doesn't have any experience working on wood.

Thank you !
 
Attached Images  
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-01-12, 05:07 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,196
Received 132 Votes on 118 Posts
Welcome to the forums!

You'll need to completely strip the top and restain. A chemical stripper works best, followed by sanding. Expect to apply 1 coat of stain and 3 coats of poly [sanding lightly between coats of poly]
 
  #3  
Old 11-01-12, 07:36 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,361
Received 53 Votes on 50 Posts
I agree with Mark. You may also need to do some sanding after the stripping, it's hard to tell from the pictures how deep some of that damage goes.
 
  #4  
Old 11-02-12, 08:01 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you !!

Can you please tell me what brand of chemical stripper, stain and poly will be best. I can either go to Home Depot or Lowes to buy it. What kind of Sand Paper? Do I need anything else. I am assuming a paint brush. Is there any particular kind of brush.

Thanks again !
 
  #5  
Old 11-02-12, 08:17 PM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,119
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
I'd like to suggest something a little bit less labor intensive....though not a permanent solution. A product called Restor-A-Finish can do a lot to make a huge difference in the appearance. Will it fix chipped coatings or deep scratches....no, but for $6 or so you might consider it. I've seen it do wonders on water damaged areas of bath and kitchen cabinets and I just recently used it on our dining room table. Minor cat claw scratches and such are unnoticeable now. Yes, I may have to do it again in 6 months...just like the cabinets.......but it is really better than "good enuf"...more like pretty darn good.

Even if the results aren't what you decide is acceptable...you can use it for other areas...and yer only out $6.

I have to say...that table must get some heavy use to look like that in 3 yrs. If the use continues...you will be doing it again down the road. Placemats and coasters look in order here....lol.
 
  #6  
Old 11-03-12, 12:08 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks GunGuy45! I will probably try the Restor-a-finish first since it seems like a easier way to go. The table did get a good use. I think the wood is not that good quality too. Not sure what kind of wood it is.
 
  #7  
Old 11-03-12, 06:37 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,196
Received 132 Votes on 118 Posts
Can you please tell me what brand of chemical stripper, stain and poly will be best
I don't use strippers very often so when I do need one, I usually talk to the paint rep at the store to get advice on which one would be best for the job at hand. I don't know if big box employees would have enough experience to give good advice

Minwax stains/polys are decent and available most anywhere although there are a slew of brands that will give decent results. Oil base poly dries to the hardest film and should wear the longest. What needs sanding determines which grit sandpaper to use. Often you'll need to start out with a coarser grit and finish with a fine grit. 100-120 grit is probably what you'd want for the initial sanding after stripping. The final sanding would be done with 180-220. Always sand with the direction of the stain!! Failure to do so will leave unsightly scratches in the wood that might be difficult to remove.

Natural bristle brushes work best for oil base coatings. Polyester, nylon or a poly/nylon blend type brushes are for latex coatings. Some with poor brush skills use a 1/4" nap mohair roller for large areas. Generally spray gives the nicest finish followed by brush with a roller being last.
 
  #8  
Old 11-03-12, 12:09 PM
the_tow_guy's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: SW Fla USA
Posts: 11,828
Received 34 Votes on 27 Posts
I've used Citrustrip Stripping Gel on refinishing several family heirlooms and it's worked very well. No fumes and really gets the old finish loosened up. I think this was my most recent rehab project:

Washstand Rehab | DoItYourself.com

I don't know that your table has enough of a finish to warrant chemical stripping; Marks sanding tips may be enough.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: