Restoring cutout in plywood

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Old 02-01-13, 11:48 AM
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Restoring cutout in plywood

I, I have a big piece of painted 3/4" plywood. I made a cut in it and drilled several holes for screws.

Long story short, I realized I had to rotate it 180 degrees, so now the hole I cut is in the wrong place and so are the screws.

I still have the piece of wood that I cut out. What is the best way to restore this so I can rotate it? The part on the back is hidden and can have something glued or fastened to it.

I was thinking to glue the cut piece to some plywood larger than the hole, and then glue that to the main piece, filling the gap partly with glue; when it's dry, add wood putty and fill the screw holes with that also. When dry re-prime and re-paint the whole thing.

What do you think?
 
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Old 02-01-13, 11:57 AM
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Since you are painting it the task is rather easy. I have two wood cabinets that had 3" holes drilled in the tops and sides for wiring, but made of real wood so wanted to repair them. I cur out pieces to fill the holes and screwed the patch to a larger piece of wood, similar to what you describe. I then screwed the larger piecs to the inside. It created some new screw holes, but they are easy to fill.

For my glue, I used the 5 minute two part epoxy you see in the hardware stores. It somewhat clear in color but when finished it sands out nicely and where I have used it over the years on wood it has never failed. I also used the same mix to fill the remaining screw holes. If it wants to run out when applied, I cover it wit a piece of scotch tape which comes off easily after it dries.

One option.

Bud
 
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Old 02-01-13, 12:12 PM
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Did you remove the larger piece of wood when the epoxy was cured?
 
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Old 02-01-13, 12:49 PM
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Yes. It left two screw holes where the larger piece was attached to the cabinet and one where the wood was attached to the patch, but easily fixed and sanded out great. I do have all kinds of sanders, but the epoxy isn't extremely hard. There are several special purpose selections, under water, plastic weld, and such, but just the general purpose variety is what I use for wood.

The traditional Elmers glue will work, but its dry time is long and it is very fluid, meaning if may run out of where it belongs.

As always, when trying a new method, test it first on some scraps.

Bud
 
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Old 02-01-13, 01:02 PM
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Thanks. I have quite some leftover epoxy that I used for granite - do you think that will work? It's a yellowish paste and an accelerator that can be mixed in to speedup the curing process.

Next question, there are several 7/16" holes with a T-nut in the back that I need to keep clean while I paint. What would you suggest? I thought of filling them temporarily with plumber's putty or something similar to keep the paint to reach the T-nut threads.
 
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Old 02-01-13, 01:15 PM
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As long as the epoxy will soak into the wood and it can be sanded easily. If it is too hard it makes it difficult to get the patch flat to match the existing surface.

Its funny, I have 3 tubes here left over from different projects, but none of them have the mfgs name on them. But they look like dual syringes with a black plunger. Very common in the glue section.

The plumbers putty should be fine, rope caulk, or something easily removed.

Bud
 
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Old 02-01-13, 01:51 PM
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This epoxy I have here comes in a metal can similar to the ones used with paint. I guess I will have to make a test and see if it sands or not; otherwise, what do you think of something like Durham's water putty? I have that one around too... but while I've used it to fill screw holes, I do not know if it can be used to hold this piece.

Thanks!
 
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Old 02-01-13, 01:56 PM
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Putty generally does not make a good adhesive, I would stick to the epoxy.
 
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Old 02-01-13, 03:34 PM
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Durham's Rock Hard Putty is a good filler but it doesn't work as an adhesive, also it's a bear to sand so when you do use it's best to apply it neatly!

Several yrs ago I hit one of my barn doors [made of plywood] with the fork on my tractor and knocked a hole in it I took my saw and cut out the damage and took 2 pieces of plywood, one bigger than the hole that was glued/screwed to the back and another one the size of the hole that was glued and screwed to the back piece. I caulked the small gap between the original plywood and the repair piece. Not perfect but it's just a barn and most won't notice the patch anyway
 
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