Building storage crates for Roulette Wheels


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Old 09-29-13, 04:35 PM
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Building storage crates for Roulette Wheels

A private school where I am volunteer, was just gifted two, nearly brand-new roulette wheels. These will be used during our frequent "Millionaire" parties that we conduct for fundraising. When I say "nearly new, I amean they are in "pristine' condition, without so much as a smudge on either wheel.

The person that donated the wheels simply gave us the two wheels but, there is no box, crate and/or container to store them in. Obviously, we want to keep these wheels in the the most secure storage environment when they are not in use. They will be storage for about 350 days per-year.

I'm interested in any/all ideas on how to build a crate or box for these items that will keep them from getting scratched while being moved about. Also, I big fears about possible moisture getting in the storage containers/crates.

In other words, I want these wheels to remain in "brand new" condition for 100 years.

The wheels are 32" round (each) and are about 9" tall with the turret removed.


Thanks.
 
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Old 09-29-13, 05:19 PM
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Where will your crates be stored? Will it be in an unconditioned space or somewhere with stable temperatures?

Roulette wheels are pretty expensive so I understand why you want to take care of the ones you have. Wheels are generally made to survive years of use almost 24 hours a day so they should survive a long time if you can keep the temperature and humidity relatively stable.
 
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Old 09-29-13, 05:25 PM
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Well, building a crate is fairly simple, but in order to make it sturdy, you need to reinforce it. The crate may well weigh as much as the wheels, just so you are aware, but they should be safe. Start with a 3/4" sheet of plywood cut 36" square to allow for padding and the corner bracing. This will be your bottom. Rip more of your plywood sheet to the following cut pattern: 2 each 12" x 36" and 2 each 12" x 37 1/2". These 4 pieces when used in combination will form a band (sides) around your base. Glue and screw the edges into the plywood base.

Now for the bracing; cut 4 pieces of 1x3 each 10 3/4" long and screw them in each corner vertically from your plywood sides. You can do the same for the bottom by cutting the 1x3's to fit between the verticals.

Locate some soft foam to pack in the bottom and around the sides and ensure a tight fit for the wheels. Your top will be 37 1/2 x 371/2" square and will fit on top of it all, where you can screw it down with intentions of removing the screws after storage.

Hope this helps some. Post back if this wasn't clear of if you need more help.
 
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Old 09-30-13, 11:21 AM
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Unfortunately, the wheels will be stored in a 100 year old building. It's heated but musty and somewhat damp.
 
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Old 09-30-13, 02:08 PM
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You may be able to include moisture grabbing containers in the boxes, but they should be checked occasionally to ensure they are not succumbing to the elements. Mold and mildew will be your nemeses.
 
 

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