Outdoor Butcher Block Table Materials?

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Old 02-13-14, 05:44 PM
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Outdoor Butcher Block Table Materials?

Hi, I hope I have the right forum. I want to make an outdoor butcher block style table top. Since it's going to be outside all the time, in snow, rain, humidity, freezing temps (Ontario, Canada), I'm looking at using cedar. Is cedar a good choice for making butcher block? My main concern is keeping the rain out of the storage that will be under the top.

I already have a cedar BBQ table that holds my Big Green Egg and aside from dirt, it's held up quite well outside all year round for about 4 years now.

If a year round wood table top is a no go that'll keep water out, then my alternates are a stainless steel top or a granite top (expensive though).

Thanks for any input!
 
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Old 02-13-14, 06:26 PM
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Are you going to use the wood as a cutting board or do you just like the way butcher block looks?

You will need to use either slow setting epoxy or polyurethane glue to join the boards together. Anything else with come apart.

Please describe the storage.
 
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Old 02-14-14, 03:38 AM
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Thanks for replying and the info.

The table will just be used for holding dishes and stuff while I BBQ. And by stuff I mean my beer. No cutting on the table. I like the way it looks and thought it was an economical way to make a table top that'll keep the water out of storage underneath. I can't think of anything else that'll hold up year round other than wood, metal or granite.

Storage under the top will just be basic cabinets and a couple of drawers. I'm thinking of mixing the build with cedar and PT, using PT where it can't be seen so much. The storage will hold BBQ accessories, cooking grates and wood chips mostly. Stuff that if it does gets wet it won't be ruined.

My main concern is the top doesn't start coming apart and leaking in water. I don't mind treating it regularly, I just don't want to have to replace it after a couple of years.
 
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Old 02-14-14, 04:21 AM
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I'd rethink using wood as it will tend to expand/contract thru weather changes. Keeping it well sealed will help but it may not be enough. Covering it up when not in use would help.
 
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Old 02-14-14, 07:53 AM
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Thanks. What's your opinion using porcelain tile? I would use the largest tiles I could find to minimize seams.
 
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Old 02-14-14, 11:26 AM
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I'm not all that knowledgeable about tile but would think it would be a better choice than wood.
 
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Old 02-14-14, 04:54 PM
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My choice would be solid surface, such as Corian. It stands up very well to weather and is non-porous so occasional cleaning is the only care. Use a matte finish & light color so minor scratches don't show. Also be sure it's acrylic based & not polyester, as polyester doesn't hold up to sunlight. Good luck
 
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