U Shaped Timber Table

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Old 03-05-14, 03:48 PM
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U Shaped Timber Table

Hi, I am not sure if anyone can help me, and sorry for my stupidity, I don't do this for a living, although I am quite the handy man, My father would normally help me with this sort of thing but he is currently on holidays.

I want to build a table for my new house, I like this sort of table because it's unique and it will fit perfectly into my house.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]27800[/ATTACH]

Although this one is butt up against the kitchen I want the legs both sites, BUT not that timber more something like this:


I like how the colours change and it looks like panels.

Now for the stupid questions, What is this timber? how do I find it where do I buy it from? To be honest I watch the Block, A tv show here and they showed a couple making one, BUT to me it looked like floor boards... is it? How do they get it so thick?

I also need to know how to get the corners so flush, it looks like one piece. I see the diagonal cut and it must glue together?

Also the finish is it just floor boards or something similar which you put together than sand it a heck of a lot and give it a coat of varnish?

If anyone knows the name of these tables, how to make them, can provide me names of timbers to use, where to buy the timber anything is very helpful! I know it sounds like I know nothing but I am learning and I have not played with this sort of thing before!
 
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Old 03-05-14, 04:14 PM
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What tools do you have available? Those look to be made from strips of wood laminated/glued together. You take strips of wood that you like. Plane the sides so they are perfectly smooth and plarallel. Glue enough pieces together to get the width that you want. Then plane, sand and finish to your liking.

Basically tables like that are not cheap and not easy for the novice. You can buy butcher block which has strips of wood already laminated together though it usually does not have the dramatic design shown in your pictures. You might not be able to duplicate the photos but with butcher block at least you have a raw material to start with.
 
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Old 03-05-14, 04:26 PM
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Thanks for your quick response, Price is no factor, I know what I want and I will get it, Price doesn't make a difference. How do they get the thickness though? all the wood I find here in bunnings (Australia) is all max 19mm which isn't enough obviously. I need it at least 40mm minimum.

What is a good timber to start with and how do I go about getting a hold of it? Tools, You name it I have it pretty much. I don't own them but my dad's workshop has nearly every tool you can name. If it doesn't have it he has a tool that will do similar.
 
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Old 03-06-14, 03:36 AM
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The table top you refer to is a stacked laminate top. The lumber is on edge, glued and clamped together. Each layer's grain is reversed to prevent warping. The wood appears to be a conglomerate of walnut, maple and oak. Not the best bed partners, but it can work. Thickness is derived by using 1x3 or similar lumber. You'll have to convert it to metric. Once your boards are cut to size (rough) and glued (set), you trim the ends square and begin your laborious sanding and finishing process with a belt sander, ending up with a finer 220 grit disc on a random orbit sander.
 
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Old 03-06-14, 04:17 AM
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As to suppliers, I would do a bit of web surfing; I'm guessing you'll be able to source it mail-order. Here in Florida the only thing in the lumber yards/home centers is oak, poplar, and softwoods. Anything else I want for a project comes from out of state. This might be a starting point (lots of links to wade through, unfortunately, many of which will be either wholesale only or not what you want):

AUSTRALIA TIMBER LUMBER FORESTRY PANEL PRODUCTS ROUNDWOOD VENEERS HARDWOOD

What state/territory are you in?
 
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Old 03-06-14, 04:22 AM
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Might also try searching woodworking clubs, who might have sources:

Australian Wood Review - Clubs
 
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Old 03-06-14, 05:42 AM
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My father in law makes a lot of furniture and other things by laminating different woods like in your photos. In some cases he has used hard wood flooring which is often the least expensive option. In the US it's normally about 3/4" (19mm) thick and available in different widths and a dizzying array of wood species. He has also bought wood from wood working wood suppliers. He found one supplier that has stock sizes but they are also the mill so he can order wood cut to whatever dimension he wants.

I also bring back exotic wood for him when I travel. In Central America the framing lumber used for building houses is pretty amazing hardwood. I don't know the wood from southern Australia but you may have some nice hardwoods locally available or from Tasmania.

You should see the look I get at the airports when I check a log as luggage. Once in Costa Rica I got called in back by security. They were very nice but wanted permission to tap on the log with a hammer, which might dent it, because their X-ray machine could not penetrate the very dense Cocobolo log.
 
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Old 03-06-14, 03:19 PM
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Brodey, the top of top you see in the second picture is called butcher block. It is a style of wood top that butchers commonly used in the old days. It is commonly made up of soft maple here in the US and is quite popular. You can buy them ready made here, but they normally come in 24" widths with varying lengths. Perhaps not large enough for your table.

The ideal way to make one yourself is to buy the lumber rough sawn. You will need to find an industry supplier for that. Then use a jointer and planer to machine the wood to size for gluing. You would want to use 8/4" material as well. It also requires a lot of clamps to keep the glue seams tight.
 
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