Best white caulk for baseboard molding? and nail hole filler?


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Old 08-28-14, 11:52 PM
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Best white caulk for baseboard molding? and nail hole filler?

I'm finishing up a bedroom and now it's time to caulk and seal the gaps on the baseboard and quarter round that is installed above wood laminate flooring. I need a caulk that is easy to apply, bright white and will never fade and one that doesn't shrink or separate from the walls over time. Not sure what brand, what type or what model of caulk to use? I see so many different kinda of caulk, but nothing specific to baseboads..
I also need something to fill the gaps of all my brad nail holes. Some type of putty or?
I used pure white behr marquee in semi gloss, so something that will match that is what I need and never fade to yellow.
Trying to do a high quality job on my home projects, so I don't want to just use whatever is cheap, I want to use the best caulk I can.
Any help in the right direction would be greatly appreciated

I made a few posts here in the past, but I guess I don't have access to my email I used, so I had to make this new account


 
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Old 08-29-14, 02:56 AM
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Welcome to the forums! Alex Plus or White Lightning are good caulks for the cracks. I would use painter's putty in the nail holes since it doesn't shrink like caulk will. Marksr will be along shortly with better advice as a professional painter.
 
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Old 08-29-14, 04:09 AM
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I'm not too fond of the alex plus but am partial to the white lightning brand of caulking. The main thing is to use a siliconized acrylic latex caulk. Keeping a damp rag or sponge handy helps with the application. Painter's putty is for the nail holes, caulking will shrink and spackling would need a primer. The final coat of enamel should be applied after the wood is caulked and puttied.
 
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Old 08-29-14, 06:21 PM
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I contacted White lightening and they said to use the 3006 Ultra All Purpose Elastomeric Sealant.

Do I use this same product to fill where I joined the baseboards together or use the painters putty?
 
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Old 08-30-14, 03:55 AM
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It depends a little on how nice the joint is but I prefer to use caulking as it adheres better and is a little bit flexible.
 
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Old 08-30-14, 04:25 AM
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ok, I will probably use the caulking then.

Here is a picture of the gaps I'm having to fill.
Room lighting and slow shutter, my images are pretty bad, but you get the idea.
It's the first time doing any kind of trim work, so it's a little rough.

Not sure why the corner was so far off, it was perfect when I pre-fit it before painting.
I didn't do any coping cuts.





 
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Old 08-30-14, 04:55 AM
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Caulk the joint in the middle of the run and the inside corner. I generally putty the gap on the outside corners but if I have any concerns that the putty might get knocked out of that joint, I'll caulk it instead. You should also caulk the top of the baseboard to the wall.
 
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Old 08-30-14, 05:01 AM
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ok will do. Thank you for your help. I plan on caulking the top and the top edge of the quarter round, just wasn't sure for the other parts until now.
I'm upgrading everything in the house, so I will probably be back soon :P

I will post my results when the room is finished and you can let me know how I did. I started with the little room so my mistakes are smaller while I learn haha..
 
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Old 08-30-14, 06:38 AM
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Apprentice painters used to start in closets and apprentice carpenters used to get started off on running base. That way any goofs from the learning process aren't as noticeable

IMO shoe molding looks better than quarter round.
 
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Old 08-30-14, 06:59 AM
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You might hold off on caulking the top if you plan on changing what looks like wall paper.

As for the outside corner, the top of the gap is wider than the bottom which may be due to the bottom kicking in more than the top. One of the tricks you will learn is that nothing is square and thus mitering 2-45 cuts will rarely fit a 90 corner. Once outside corners are taped and mudded, they are something other than 90. Plus I like to have my exposed edge closed and if there is a gap I want it next to the drywall. Reverse on an inside corner.

Then there is the "tipping" of the trim. The bottom will often have a void where the drywall doesn't go all the way to the floor and/or less mud and thus you need to fudge the 90 angle that the 44.5 is following. You will quickly learn that those 90 and 45 preset stops aren't always the best.

Once you get good at this you will be more of an artist than a trimmer.

Bud
 
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Old 08-30-14, 07:56 AM
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Too late for you now but I generally apply a bead of caulk to the edge of the trim as I install it. Then just wipe off the caulk that squeezes out with a clean damp sponge. I like to let caulk set a few minutes before dressing it so that gives you time to nail it. I keep a 5 gallon bucket of water for the sponge. A clean sponge is important. Probably slows down installation but speeds up painting prep if you are going to do both.
 
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Old 08-30-14, 09:33 AM
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I usually keep a 1-2 gallon bucket of water to set my sponge in. It's important that you squeeze out most of the water before you use the sponge as too much water will degrade the caulking! The damp sponge [rag will also work] helps smooth out the caulk, cleaning off the excess and keeps your fingers clean too
 
 

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