First Timer Tool Advice


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Old 10-19-14, 02:27 PM
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First Timer Tool Advice

I just recently became a home owner. I do not have many tools at all, but I am interested in getting some more but I don't know what to look for given what I would like to do so I'm hoping you all can give me some advice as to what to get, brands to stay away from, etc.

I would like to be able to put up baseboard, crown mouldings, chair rails, wainscoting, that kind of thing.

So I'm thinking I need a basic compressor, what brands are good? how big do I need?

Also thinking I need a finishing nailer, any other kind of nailer?

Also think I need a miter saw, why do people get 12in as opposed to 10in? Is there other considerations I need to make such as different kinds of miter saws?

Any other tools suggestions?
 
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Old 10-19-14, 03:20 PM
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The bigger miter saws allow you to cut bigger/taller woodwork. A compound miter saw is more versatile than the tradiional miter saw. A nail gun doesn't need a lot of compressor to operate it but I would consider what other uses you might have in the future and size the compressor accordingly. I had a finish nailer for yrs before I got a framing nailer - not sure why I waited so long
 
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Old 10-19-14, 03:25 PM
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Back when I did home repair I used a 12" miter saw almost every day but seldom for molding. It was my go to saw for everything thing up to landscape timber at 45. You just don't have as big a range of uses for a 10". In fact I'd recommend a sliding miter saw if you can afford it. Just don't think of it as a molding saw. It has far more uses.
 
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Old 10-19-14, 03:37 PM
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There are many good kits out there with a small compact compressor and several guns.
 
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Old 10-19-14, 05:42 PM
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Tools

12 in. sliding compound mitre saw
Oiled compressor. Oiledless are too noisy.
18 gauge finish nailer, preferably angled.
Tables saw

Just a few to get you started.
 
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Old 10-19-14, 07:02 PM
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Go and study EVERYTHING that Festool sells. Before your brain gets captured by the 'box' store style of problem solving, at least look at how they do it. At some time in the distant future, you will look back on this moment, and realize what a fork in the road you are in !!
 
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Old 10-20-14, 03:26 AM
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Man, I hate getting to a party after it is over Good advice, all. If you need particular information about the use of the tools, or which tool will suit you best, let us know. Yes, Festool is a great line of tools. They know it and charge accordingly.
 
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Old 10-20-14, 04:20 AM
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18 gauge finish nailer, preferably angled
I could be wrong but I think all 18 gauge [16 too] are straight, the 15 gauge finish nailer is angled.
I don't like to work near an oilless air compressor! the oiled compressors tend to last longer too.
 
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Old 10-20-14, 04:26 AM
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Apache makes an 18 gauge angle nailer, but the nails aren't readily available at big orange or blue to my knowledge. I think the nail gun depot carries them both. I have never seen a need for an angle nail in 18 gauge.
 
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Old 10-20-14, 06:09 AM
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As Chandler said, I'm a bit late to the party. But I would like to add that before you buy power tools make sure you have a good set of hand tools. No power tool can replace a quality hand tool. Once you have quality hand tools then get power tools as the project dictates. No need to over spend by buying tools you don't need. My practice is to buy a quality tool for the project at hand and chalk the price as part of the project. That way you'll get the most up to date tool when needed.
 
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Old 10-20-14, 07:45 AM
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Thank you for all the responses so far. I definitely realize that I don't want to make mistakes now and suffer later. That's why I came here to ask the questions.

I looked on the Festool site but their Miter saw is $1,400 which is way more then I was looking to spend for just a Miter saw. I realize it might be a great brand, but as a beginner I don't think that would be worth it for me as who knows how much I would use it after the projects I do.

Anyone have suggestions on brands in terms of miter saws, compressors, nailers, etc?

I know it's from a big box store, but what about this miter saw from Sears? Says its a sliding compound miter saw, 12 inch. http://www.sears.com/craftsman-12inc...3&blockType=G3

And again thanks for all your help so far. I'm glad I found this site!
 

Last edited by Irish Pride; 10-20-14 at 08:08 AM.
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Old 10-20-14, 07:54 AM
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I only have a standard 10" miter saw, not one of the name brands, paid $100 for it 10-12 yrs ago. It works fine for what I need. A sliding saw combines the miter feature along with something like a radial arm saw. It allows you to cut wider pieces of trim.
 
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Old 10-20-14, 08:21 AM
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Go for it. Unless you're in the business the Big Box store stuff is more than adequate.
 
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Old 10-20-14, 09:40 AM
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Your profile indicates non U.S. but IP indicates U.S. None of our suggestions will work on 220 volts. Which country are you going to use these tools in?

My 12" is brand name but only cost $100 because it came from a pawn shop. Still working after 15+ years. Check out Harbor Freight for far more reasonable prices. You could buy five* saws there for what Festool wanted. Yes Harbor Freight may not be the best quality but for the light use of home repair they are fine. One thing I will suggest is stay away from battery powered tools. You want something that doesn't need to be recharged when you need it, doesn't need a charge before you finish, and really has the power to do the job.

*Or buy nine 10" sliding miter saws (probably all you need) for the cost of the Festool one.
 
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Old 10-20-14, 10:10 AM
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My miter saw is a 10" Craftsman and it has worked just fine for the 12 years or so I have owned it. Would I buy it again? Maybe not but I don't have any regrets about the machine itself.

Also mentioned, there are usually pretty good deals out there for compressor kits which include several guns. I bought a Porter Cable set I've been pretty happy with except I dumped the oilless compressor after a few months for an oiled one as it was so noisy I had to leave the garage when it cycled.
 
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Old 10-20-14, 02:14 PM
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Why a 18 gauge finishing nailer as opposed to a 16 gauge?

It looked like the 16 gauge was better for crown mouldings, chair rail, etc. What are the advantages of getting 18 gauge, can it do everything the 16 gauge can?
 
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Old 10-20-14, 02:19 PM
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Some like 18 gauge because it leaves a small nail hole but most pin nailers [18 gauge] are limited in the length of brad they can shoot. I have a 16 gauge nail gun and am well satisfied with it. Many like the 15 gauge because the angle allows you to get tighter into corners.
 
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Old 10-20-14, 03:01 PM
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Good catch Ray. Never saw that. (Non-US from the OP)
 
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Old 10-20-14, 03:13 PM
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And oddly he is not answering the question.
 
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Old 10-20-14, 03:58 PM
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I saw it right away, but it doesn't mean he isn't a Canuck. Unless the wording gets wonky or his terminology gives him away, I just keep on until one of you Groups hang him out to dry. He may be from Ireland, who knows?
 
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Old 10-20-14, 04:11 PM
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IP is red white and blue not maple leaf.
 
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Old 10-21-14, 04:30 AM
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Sorry, apparently my post did not go through. I live in the US, not Europe.
 
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Old 10-21-14, 04:32 AM
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Please update profile shows non-us Thanks
 
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Old 10-21-14, 04:34 AM
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Just did, thanks. Didn't notice that when I was posting. :-)
 
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Old 10-21-14, 08:00 AM
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Thank you.

.
 
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Old 10-21-14, 03:50 PM
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Airless compressors are usually real noisey. However, I recommend the Senco PC1010. It is real light and quiet to operate.

18 gauge guns are good because of the smaller hole that they leave. You can buy guns that will shoot a 2" nail. That will be long enough for trim work. The advantage of the 16 gauge is that the nail will have more power to hold and force a piece of trim against a surface that is not straight. The size of the hole left won't matter if it is painted. If stained, you want the smallest hole possible.

I find the Dewalt miter saws to be some of the worst. They don't have straight fences and the bearings are too small. 12" saws will allow to cut crown while standing up. With a 10" compound miter saw, you can cut it while laying flat. I find the Hitachi 10" slider to be a top performer.
 
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Old 10-21-14, 03:54 PM
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Droo - you mean OIL-LESS compressors, right?
 
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Old 10-21-14, 04:39 PM
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No, the airless ones are REALLY quiet Just don't perform very well.

I use a 12" Ridgid double bevel miter saw with an offset motor. Belt driven. Cuts tall molding standing up quite well. My Bosch 12" stays in the shop, relegated to just cutting wood, since the motor hits molding.
 
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Old 10-22-14, 03:39 AM
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18 gauge guns are good because of the smaller hole that they leave. .............. If stained, you want the smallest hole possible
As long as you do a decent job of color matching the putty, the size of the hole doesn't matter that much. Done right, you have to search to find 15 gauge nail holes.
 
 

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