Sanding question on project


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Old 10-20-15, 04:41 AM
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Sanding question on project

So I am building a frame face for an aquarium stand.
Im using my kreg jig with pocket screws for it as Ive done with many other projects very nicely. Gluing all of them with gorilla wood glue.
Something odd happened this time though. Im not sure if the wood (select pine) was a bit bowed or warped but when I screwed in the pocket screws the wood shifted a tad bit and where the joints are there is about an 1/8th or 32nd rise you can feel.

Ive sanded smooth jointed surfaces before but was wondering if you guys think this is just to much?
I tried hitting it for a second with my orbital and it did sand down a bit but Im wondering if sanding it too much so the seams are flat will make it end up looking wavy.

Im going to stain it ebony black and clear with something probably not super glossy so it should hide a bit I hope.



 
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Old 10-20-15, 06:12 AM
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there is about an 1/8th or 32nd rise you can feel.
There is a big difference between an 1/8 & 1/32. I imagine that a belt sander would do the trick. One thing that I was taught was that paint or stain doesn't hide imperfections, it makes them more obvious.
 
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Old 10-20-15, 06:18 AM
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An 1/8 is quite a bit to remove by sanding, but doable. You don't have a lot of options since it's glued together. I'd try sanding first, and if you're not happy with result, you can remove pocket screws, carefully cut off the stiles without damaging the rails, and make new pieces.

When sanding, try to taper the piece over most of its length so it stays relatively flat, and it shouldn't be very noticeable when finished. Keep the sander moving so you don't create dips.

Pieces will sometimes shift when using pocket screws if the screw hits a hard part of the grain, or if they are not tightly clamped to a flat surface.

Good luck with your project.
 
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Old 10-20-15, 08:33 AM
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Just as with taping and mudding drywall joints, the further out you taper this, the less noticeable it will be.
 
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Old 10-20-15, 08:59 AM
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Stain will highlight any cross grain sanding scratches so after you get it level special care will need to be paid to insure any cross grain scratches are removed.
 
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Old 10-20-15, 11:19 AM
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sorry should have said like a 16th
 
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Old 10-20-15, 03:30 PM
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You should be using a face clamp to hold the joint flush as you screw it. Also I prefer just a dab of normal titebond wood glue and would never use the gorilla glue on face franes. You have to be SUPER careful when using glue on a stain grade project since anything with glue on it will reject the stain somewhat. Get a face clamp or maybe a pocket clamp. The glue lubricates the joint and makes it slip a little more than usual so you almost have to compensate for that when you start your screw, expecting that its going to slide 1/16th farther than you expect it to.
 
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Old 10-22-15, 06:10 AM
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Thanks for the tips guys.
Im gonna try sanding it down for now to avoid starting from scratch.

Any tips on paper grade on an orbital to start from to avoid tearing up pine to bad
 
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Old 10-22-15, 06:13 AM
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The coarser the grit is that you start with the quicker you'll be able to sand it level. Then it's just a matter of going progressively finer with the grit until you've removed all the sanding scratches.
 
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Old 10-22-15, 06:28 AM
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Not to get all "old school" on you but...a well sharpened bench plane will take those joints down flush a lot faster than sanding. Then just some minimal finish sanding. If you like to do wood projects, it might be worth investing in a mid priced plane.
 
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Old 10-22-15, 09:57 AM
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You can use 80 grit to take it down pretty fast but you will want to follow it up with 120.
 
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Old 10-23-15, 04:48 AM
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thanks guys,

I actually do have a hand planer but was a bit afraid of taking out a chunk accidentally. I am probably over exaggerating the lip in the wood of course, its not like I measured it.
I have different grade of paper for the sander, Ill start with the 80 and level it out then work up to my 220 to smooth it.

Wish me luck
 
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Old 10-23-15, 05:38 AM
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I wouldn't go finer than 150 grit. 220 will close up the pores/grain of the wood making it difficult for the wood to accept stain.
 
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Old 10-27-15, 05:46 AM
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was able to sand it down nicely.

also used some clamps this time around and they worked out nicely.
 
 

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