refinishing a table


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Old 11-16-15, 06:36 AM
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refinishing a table

I spent much of the past two weeks stripping paint that a previous owner slathered in all my window frames. Given my limited work space, I kept all my supplies on a table covered in a plastic drop cloth.

No need to tell me that was not the best way to do things; I had limited time and space and needed to get this project done. Besides, the table was from a garage sale.

I now have two or three large areas where the surface looks horrible. I cannot see any signs of stripper getting through, so I think it is condensation from where the waste bags were sitting on the table. Whatever the problem is, I now get to decide if it is worth the hassle of resurfacing the table.

What is the best way to strip the surface of the table?
I have no idea if the table top is solid or veneer. Does it make a difference? How do I check?

This is not an expensive table. I'm looking for a way to make it presentable without just covering it with a tablecloth.

Thanks
 
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Old 11-16-15, 06:52 AM
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A picture might help.
Look under the table, is it the same material as the top side?
 
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Old 11-16-15, 07:06 AM
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Yes, I really do need to start thinking about these questions at home when I can take a picture instead of at the office when I cannot do much.

The table seems like it's the same wood going through, and nothing causes me to think it's a veneer.
 
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Old 11-16-15, 07:20 AM
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"Looks horrible" in what way? If it's bulging, lifted or split you may have to replace the top or strip it and let it dry to see if it shrinks back. If it's just cloudy from water into the finish only, you might have success with the many home remedies like spreading mayonnaise on it to draw the water out.

Formby's and other brands make a finish rejuvenator that will soften the original finish so it can be brushed smooth again. Read the label in a store or online to see if it sounds like the direction you want to go. Personally I prefer to just strip off the damaged finish and start over. Sounds like you already have supplies and experience for that :-)

My wife would use the damage as an excuse to paint the table. She loves painting perfectly good furniture (I'm not a fan).
 
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Old 11-16-15, 11:21 AM
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Here is a photo of the effected area.

I have also changed my opinion about the veneer. Breaks in the pattern on the side do not match the breaks on the top.

Name:  Table.jpg
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The white/yellow patches have a rough texture. All the haze around them are simply annoying.
 
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Old 11-16-15, 12:51 PM
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What happens if you lightly sand that and a little of the surrounding area with 180-220 grit and then wipe it clean with mineral spirits? If that makes it look decent, I'd lightly sand the whole top and apply a fresh coat of poly.
 
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Old 11-17-15, 06:23 AM
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Thank for the suggestion. I didn't get much of a chance to try it last night. Maybe I'll complete enough other projects tonight to attempt it.
 
 

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