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Outside wood sign


mystang89's Avatar
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11-05-17, 07:26 AM   #1 (permalink)  
Outside wood sign

I purchased a farm which had lots of locus trees which needed to be felled. Out of love of those locus trees I decided to make a sign for our farm which was going to be seen from the road. I want to keep the original grain and everything. No paint, no stain but I need something to protect the wood from the elements. One thing that is already starting to happen is mold and that is only after 5 weeks or so of it being out.

I looked up boiled and raw linseed oil and found they were good for protection from elements but attracted mold. Already have that problem.

I've used polyurethane before. Not good for outside use.

What would be the best solution which wouldn't attract mold, lay a reasonably long time and doesn't of yellow UV?

 
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XSleeper's Avatar
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11-05-17, 07:40 AM   #2 (permalink)  
I would coat it with creocoat or coppercoat and then let it weather.

Locust is one of the best kinds of firewood there is. I also saw a guy make cabinets out of it once... i envy you.

 
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11-05-17, 08:11 AM   #3 (permalink)  
Locust will hold up well without any coating but will turn grey - is that what you are wanting to prevent? if so, I'd recommend a translucent or toner stain.

I like locust for firewood - burns well will little ash. It can be difficult to finish cutting if it's been cut down and allowed to set for awhile. Not sure I've ever seen anyone use it for anything other than fence posts and firewood.


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11-05-17, 08:17 AM   #4 (permalink)  
Thanks for the replies.

I didn't know it would turn grey but yeah, I'd like to prevent that, kind of keep its natural coloring but also really wanted to prevent the mold that is starting to appear where the bark meets the flesh of the wood.

Most of the trees here are locus and cedar. I've been very blessed because I had 7acres of land that needed to be re-fenced and I didn't have to but I single post. This was one of the pieces that I cut to small to be a post so though I could put it to good use.

Edit : I did a bit of research and it seems that "Freshly applied COPPERCOAT dries to a rich copper brown. After immersion COPPERCOAT oxidizes to a dark, verdigris green color."

Or seems that creocoat in parts a dark color when it dries as well. Can anyone verify this?


Last edited by mystang89; 11-05-17 at 10:00 AM.
 
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11-05-17, 06:21 PM   #5 (permalink)  
Did a bit more searching and found people dating acrylic waterborne would be good too. Also saw enamel spray but couldn't see if it would protect the wood from mold or if there were any negatives to using it.

A friend recommended sparathane. Thoughts?

 
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11-06-17, 04:19 AM   #6 (permalink)  
I'm not familiar with sparathane, do you mean varathane? I've only used their interior varnish but they might have a spar coating. It will still have the issues associated with varnish/poly used on the exterior.

Generally water based products won't mildew as fast as oil base coatings and often resist fading more than oil base. Oil base seals better but doesn't always weather as well. There are packets of extra mildewcide you can add to most coatings. I don't know if the big box stores carry them but most any paint store should.


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12-03-17, 08:00 AM   #7 (permalink)  
So I decided to just spar urethane water based. It says it's superior uv protection, mold & mildew resistant and seals out water. It specifically states that it is for exterior use.

Today I went outside and there was coat on my sign so I wiped it off. It took some of the urethane with it! This is after 3 coats.

Sometimes PLEASE tell me what's going on?!

 
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12-03-17, 08:08 AM   #8 (permalink)  
A coat on your sign? A coat of what?

???

It sounds like the wood was still wet when you put the urethane on... wood has to be dry before you seal it. Can't really comment much, but it's an adhesion problem. If you cut a live tree down, then made something out of the wood, then put urethane on it.. that would explain it.

 
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12-03-17, 10:23 AM   #9 (permalink)  
How long did the spar urethane dry before it was placed outside?

 
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12-03-17, 10:34 AM   #10 (permalink)  
Not sure if I've ever used a water based spar poly. As the others have asked; how long did the wood get to dry/season before the 1st coat was applied? how long between coats of spar poly? did you sand between coats?


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