Table Saw Blade for Ripping 1x Pine

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Old 01-24-21, 06:57 AM
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Question Table Saw Blade for Ripping 1x Pine

Just bought my first table saw - a DeWalt DWE7491RS. It came with a 24 teeth blade. I'm working on trim project and need to rip an inch off of 1x5 pine boards and still be able to use both pieces. Is the blade that came with it the right one or should I grab one with a few more teeth?

Admittedly I haven't done a ton of ripping except for assisting. I keep reading online that 24T is great for ripping, but it seems like that might do more harm than good on such a thin piece of pine.
 
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Old 01-24-21, 07:19 AM
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I think the blade on my table saw is 24T, it rips 1x pine just fine. You'd still want to sand the cut portion if it shows. One of the carpenters should be along shortly with better info for you.
 
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Old 01-24-21, 07:54 AM
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Your 24 tooth should be fine for that. You will also want at least one feather board to hold the boards against the fence, and I often use one on the fence to hold the stock to the table as well. And, depending on the width you may need a pusher. I make my feather boards and pushers, but you can make or buy them.
 
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Old 01-24-21, 07:54 AM
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24 teeth is typical and does a good job at a reasonable speed. Among many factors the main key to a rip saw is the alternating profile of the teeth as opposed to the in-line of a cross cut.

This is rip cut profile



This is a cross cut profile.


Image credit: http://www.blackburntools.com/articl...try/index.html
 

Last edited by XSleeper; 01-24-21 at 08:08 AM. Reason: Added image credit
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Old 01-24-21, 08:00 AM
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Pretty much any blade will work. However the "quality" of the cut is affected by the number of teeth on the blade. Typically the more teeth on the blade, the smoother the cut will be... and the less sanding you would need to do to get rid of any saw marks on the side that you cut.

Other factors to a smooth cut depend on you... keeping it tight to the fence the entire time, feeding the board smoothly (no stopping), keeping it flat on the table the entire time.

But depending on what you are doing, a perfectly smooth cut isn't always needed, as the cut side can often be turned in such a way that its hidden. In other words, not every project requires S4S (a woodworking term that means "surfaced on 4 sides".) Others say smooth on 4 sides or sanded on 4 sides... same difference.

So its possible your ripping blade would work just fine. Less teeth cut faster (more aggressively) which is easier on the saw motor, because there is less drag. But there is often a little more vibration... which, in combination with less teeth is what makes the saw marks more prominent on the cut.

For a nicely illustrated article on different types of blades and their uses you could Google "Essential Table Saw Blades by Tim Johnson." I don't want to link to it since it contains some advertising links as well.
 
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Old 01-24-21, 08:13 AM
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On a 10" blade 24 teeth is fairly versatile.
40 and 60 teeth remove quite a bit of material but could be a better choice if you want to reduce sanding on a finished piece.
I would suggest you get a 40 tooth blade and see how you like it.
 
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Old 01-24-21, 08:26 AM
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Very seldom will a saw cut surface be good enough to used as is as a viewable surface. Sanding is almost always needed. So I'm going to disagree with GregH on this one. Before you buy a 32 or 40 tpi blade try a few practice cuts first and see what you think. Unless you have extensive woodworking or are really into wood working a finer tooth blade may be a waste of money (but now days blades are cheap enough, so not to worry).
 
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Old 01-24-21, 08:41 AM
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GregH said "reduce sanding" not eliminate sanding.
 
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Old 01-24-21, 08:42 AM
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Just bought my first table saw
If you have not taken a shop course or used a table saw before (or even if you have) I recommend you Google some YouTube videos on saw safety and take suitable precautions (as suggested by aka pedro).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUx8oTIALmg The slo-mo explanation of the kickback incident in this one is especially good.

If you are not even a little bit apprehensive about what you are trying to do with the saw then you probably aren't paying enough attention to safety.
 
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Old 01-24-21, 10:22 AM
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A 24T blade is probably the most common table saw blade. DeWalt makes a 32T general purpose blade that might give you a better cut.

My opinion is that the table saw becomes most dangerous when you are very familiar and experienced with it.
 
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Old 01-24-21, 10:43 AM
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Familiarity breeds contempt? Well that may seem true but I don't think that's the problem.
We become lax and sometimes over confident and sometimes distracted or forgetful.

Just ask Marksr!

I would rather be very be an experienced operator and an operator that is very familiar with the particular equipment than not.

Ever turn down the radio in the car when looking for direction in an unfamiliar area? What does that have to do with the subject matter?
I have no idea. It just sounded good.
 
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Old 01-24-21, 10:46 AM
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If your in the market for a quality blade let me recommend the best blade made.

These hardwood/pergo blades are Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) Tipped, I picked up one when doing a floor job and was so amazed by their performance I have converted over every saw to use these.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/DIABLO-1...12LF/205040139

They never need sharpening, they cut anything like soft butter, and if you want to eliminate sanding a cut these will do it.

Don't waste money on conventional blades! I have several I should sell as I will never use them again!

 
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Old 01-24-21, 11:14 AM
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Holy sawdust Batman. At $74 a pop they damn well better cut with out sanding.
 
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Old 01-24-21, 11:31 AM
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Yea, but every time I had my 12" 80 tooth blade sharpened it was something like $24.

Not sure how well the image will show but this was some plywood I just ripped today, no splintering!


 
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Old 01-25-21, 03:38 PM
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Appreciate the advice everyone, as well as the link to the Gosforth Handyman. I'm also a big fan of Steve Ramsey and his Woodworking for Mere Mortals series...

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBB...uBtk8UqSQYc9-w
 
 

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